Politica Mexicana, Economia y Finanzas.
 
ÍndiceÍndice  SoporteSoporte  CalendarioCalendario  FAQFAQ  BuscarBuscar  MiembrosMiembros  Grupos de UsuariosGrupos de Usuarios  RegistrarseRegistrarse  Conectarse  AdministracionAdministracion  Viejo ForoViejo Foro  

Comparte | 
 

 REPORTES sobre mexico

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo 
Ir a la página : 1, 2  Siguiente
AutorMensaje
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 3:51 pm

son de un apagina que me suscribi de plano, voy a subir los que pueda en el mes de suscripcion, estan largos de a madre pero me vale madre

espero les sirvan de algo.


este es un analisis geopolitico interesante, no lo he terminado pero al rato me lo aviento completo en una visita al trono

The Geopolitics of Mexico: A Mountain Fortress Besieged
November 17, 2009 | 1530 GMT
PRINTPRINT Text Resize:
ShareThis

The Geopolitics of Mexico: A Mountain Fortress Besieged

Editor’s Note:This is the 11th in a series of STRATFOR monographs on the geopolitics of countries influential in world affairs. Click here for a printable PDF of the monograph in its entirety.

A Difficult Hand

“Poor Mexico, so far from God, so close to the United States!” — Attributed to Mexican leader Porfirio Diaz (1830-1915)
Print Version

* To download a PDF of this piece click here.

Related Special Topic Page

* Geopolitical Monographs: In-depth Country Analysis

As the southernmost portion of North America, Mexico was dealt a difficult geographic hand. It has a small and limited core territory surrounded by mountains, deserts and jungles that are inherently hard to control and nearly impossible to defend against threats from within or without.

The country is funnel-shaped, its high plateau anchored in the mountains and jungles of Central America to the south. The funnel fans and expands northwest toward a 2,000-mile-long desert border with the United States. Bordering the plateau to the east and west are Mexico’s two mountain ranges, the Sierra Madre Oriental and the Sierra Madre Occidental. With peaks as high as 18,000 feet, these mountain ranges are extensive and formidable — indeed, the country can be thought of as a kind of mountain fortress that must secure outlying territories that serve as approaches to its core.


(click here to enlarge image)

On Mexico’s western flank, the slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental drop precipitously toward the Pacific Ocean. Blanketed alternately with dense deciduous tropical forests and so-called “spine forests,” the vegetation of Mexico’s western slopes is as inhospitable as it sounds. Though patches of savanna in Sinaloa and Sonora states serve as adequate grazing land for cattle and other livestock, western Mexico requires significant infrastructure to divert water from the region’s relatively sparse river system for agricultural use.

On the eastern slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental, the land drops away to wider flatlands compared to the narrow littoral strip on the western coast, flatlands characterized by dense tropical forests. Despite the relative richness of the land, with its face to the Gulf of Mexico and the vast majority of the world’s great powers to its east, Mexico’s eastern shores have also proved to be a military vulnerability for the Mexican heartland.

No less challenging to the Mexican state are the country’s deserts, which characterize the northern border and boast some of the most desolate territory in all of North America. This no-man’s-land forms an impressive buffer between Mexico and its powerful northern neighbor, but it is also the historical seat of insurrection for any force (most often domestic) seeking to challenge Mexico’s core.

The Heartland

The heart of Mexico is roughly the region also known as ancient Mesoamerica, which lies between the Tropic of Cancer and the 18th parallel. This region is the native home of the Olmec, Toltec, Aztec and many other North American tribes. Within this region is the true core of Mexico, which STRATFOR views as a double core, with two geographically distinct yet vital centers: the region around the Valley of Mexico and the region of Veracruz.

Situated at the crux of the sierras in the Valley of Mexico, Mexico City is the unquestionable political core of Mexico. This high plateau was home to the Aztecs and was the origin of one of the world’s most important grains: corn. Though this region lies at tropical latitudes, the high altitude of the plateau mitigates the tropical influence, providing for a mild, temperate climate suitable for agriculture and sustaining relatively large populations. The sheer heights of the mountains to the east and west of the city also afford the high plateau a certain amount of fortification from outside threats.

Established in the middle of a lake that filled the Valley of Mexico, Mexico City was originally the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan. Hardly the choicest land in the area, the location was originally selected for settlement at a time when the Aztecs were one of the weakest tribes in the region. The Aztecs ingeniously built the city literally right out of the water, using stone and lime to build temples and growing crops on platforms in the middle of the lake, called chinampas. In the 16th century, the Spaniards built a canal linking the Valley of Mexico to the Tula river system. The project effectively drained the lake but left the city with numerous problems, including severe foundational instability and vulnerability to earthquakes (recent years have ironically been characterized by severe water shortages).

Despite its questionable location, Mexico City is a critical component of national control: Whoever controls the capital can control the highlands. That said, Mexico’s rough terrain makes it difficult to secure control of the rest of the country, and Mexico City often finds itself fending off threats from all sides.

The greatest threats, historically, have come from the city of Veracruz, which forms the second pole of Mexico’s double core, on the eastern shore of Southern Mexico. This lowland tropical region was home to the Olmecs, one of Mesoamerica’s earliest tribes. The lush tropical climate in Veracruz has historically permitted the growth of a wide variety of plants to sustain the Olmec diet, including squash and beans. However, the humid climate makes it difficult to grow grains, thus the coastline is unsuitable for sustaining large populations.

The city of Veracruz has also been the point from which foreign (and domestic) powers have been able to successfully launch invasions of Mexico City. As one of Mexico’s main Gulf ports, with direct access to Mexico City, Veracruz is a key jumping-off point from the coast to Mexico City. Veracruz was originally established by Spanish explorer Hernan Cortez, who used his time there to form alliances with local tribes that had been subjugated by the Aztecs and were only too happy to support a new regional strongman. In the company of thousands of native warriors, Cortez successfully laid siege to and captured Tenochtitlan from the Aztecs in 1521.

In time, following the collapse of the Spanish empire, the chaos of Mexico’s wars of independence was exploited by France, which crowned Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph Hapsburg Emperor of Mexico in Mexico City in 1864. After battling inland from their landing point in Veracruz, the French occupied Mexico City for three years. They soon discovered that taking Mexico City was one thing. Taking Mexico was quite another. The problem for the French was the sheer time and manpower required to conquer Mexico’s far-flung deserts, mountains and plateaus — and even solidifying control over areas as close to Mexico City as the state of Oaxaca, where rebel forces were able to find sanctuary. The French were unable to solidify their control over Mexico’s territory, and in 1867 French Emperor Napoleon III withdrew troops, leaving the hapless Maximilian to be executed by irate Mexicans.

It is of the highest priority for Mexico to control the highland region around Mexico City as well as the lowland region on the Gulf coast around Veracruz in order to guarantee the existence of the state. As the French example shows, however, there are nearby areas that must also be controlled. We refer to these regions as the outer core, which consists of the states within the boundaries of ancient Mesoamerica but outside the immediate vicinity of Mexico City or Veracruz. These states include the mountainous, rugged states of Chiapas, Oaxaca, Michoacan and Guerrero. Because of their mountainous terrain, these states can be difficult to control and can serve as jumping-off points for rebellious forces. For Mexico City, it is critical — at a minimum — to contain and mitigate unrest in these areas in order to guarantee the physical security of the core.

Political Boundaries

Mexico’s core territories are critically important to the survival of the state. Less critical
— but still important — are Mexico’s current political boundaries, which encompass a much larger territory that has repeatedly defied subjugation.

The Spanish viceroyalty established Mexico’s southern borders with Guatemala and Belize (which were solidified by treaty in 1882). Upon independence, there was no impetus to push farther south, primarily because the land in Central America is mountainous, difficult to defend or control and not suited for agriculture. The next patch of useful territory is well over 1,000 miles south — in the highlands of Colombia — and everything in between is far more trouble than it is worth. For Mexico, there was nothing to be gained in challenging the southern borderline (indeed, it might actually behoove Mexico to cede more of the mountainous, half-wild territory of Chiapas to its southern neighbor).

The northern borders are a different story altogether. Two seminal events defined the northern border: the Texas War for Independence and the U.S.-Mexican War (known in Mexico as the War of Northern Aggression). The war with Texas effectively released the vast majority of Texas to independence, but it also set the stage for a war between the United States and Mexico by leaving the actual border hotly disputed. Once Texas joined the United States, this dispute erupted into all-out war between the two North American neighbors. The conquering of Mexico City in 1847 by the United States ended the war, with the United States taking about half of Mexico’s total original territory — all of Texas along with the land that would become the modern U.S. states of Arizona, California and New Mexico. In one crushing blow, the United States satisfied critical strategic needs (namely an undisputed path to the Pacific Ocean and a strategic buffer for the Greater Mississippi Valley) by relieving Mexico of some of its most promising territory, leaving the country in a state of turmoil.

To put it simply, Mexico’s northern border is neither a product of inevitable geographic dictation nor a border of Mexico’s choosing. Stretching across vast expanses of the Sonora, Chihuahua and Baja deserts, the U.S.-Mexico border bisects a section of Mexico that is at most points only barely habitable. To make things more complicated, the mountains that stretch up into this region allow for pockets of unrest to simmer, and eventually boil over. The physical isolation of northern Mexico and the difficulty Mexico City had in projecting power into the area was one of the most important reasons it lost Texas and what is now the American Southwest, and one of the key causes of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920.


(click here to enlarge image)

The mountains, deserts and isolation of northern Mexico provide fertile ground for civil dissent and lawless activity. Thus, while northern Mexico provides a substantial strategic buffer between Mexico City and its northern neighbor, it is also a severe vulnerability. Add to that the fact that Mexico City remains highly vulnerable on its eastern flank, and the benefits of the buffer zone seem negligible.

In addition to its northern expanse, Mexico has two other territories that fall outside the core and are noteworthy. Neither of these territories is particularly useful, but both are strategically important to hold. The first is the Baja California Peninsula, which Mexico managed to retain after the U.S.-Mexican War, despite the U.S. desire to hold the mouth of the Colorado River. Baja stretches nearly 800 miles down the western coast of Mexico, and while it provides little in the way of economic opportunities (outside of tourism), if it were in the hands of a foreign country, Mexico’s entire northern Pacific coast would be very vulnerable to external attack.

The second territory in this category is the Yucatan Peninsula. The Yucatan is essentially a large, flat limestone shelf with very few fresh water resources. So while the outcropping has verdant vegetation, it has none of the necessary elements of economically viable terrain. Yucatan does, however, give Mexico a strategic position in the Caribbean. It also allows Mexico to control one of the avenues of approach into the Gulf of Mexico and, of course, Veracruz.

In the cases of both the Baja California and Yucatan peninsulas, Mexico is the owner of seriously inhospitable territory. But the important point is that not having that territory would expose Mexico to even greater territorial vulnerabilities, particularly regarding naval threats.

Even with the relative advantages of having strategic possessions like the Yucatan and Baja California peninsulas, the national borders of Mexico do not make for a politically coherent and manageable state. The mountainous core makes it difficult to solidify control over the southern highlands, and the southeastern coast is devastatingly vulnerable to outside interference. Add to that the hard-to-control northern border zone — a fertile breeding ground for autonomous or rebellious groups — and Mexico has a geography that presents extreme challenges to any central government.

Ideal Boundaries

So, then, what would Mexico’s ideal territorial boundaries be, taking into account the geopolitical necessities of a state that has proved so vulnerable to external influence? First and foremost, Mexico must establish control over the main routes of attack on its territory, and only after that will it have the capability to look farther afield for prosperous lands.

It is not easy to invade Mexico via land routes, since the northern Mexican frontier historically has made invasion from the north difficult (though defending this territory is also a challenge), and the highlands of Central America are a barrier to the south. It is far easier to invade Mexico from the sea. This means that if Mexico is to achieve any semblance of true security it must be able to guard the sea approaches to its core. Not only does Europe lie across the Atlantic, but the vast majority of the United States’ populated coastline also lies just to the northeast. In the future, rising Brazilian naval capacity could pose yet another possible challenge to Mexico in the Caribbean. In order to protect the core from these potential threats, Mexico must exert influence over the mouth of the Caribbean. And to effectively do this, Mexico needs Florida and Cuba. This puts Mexico in direct competition with the United States for its key strategic needs.

Just as the United States needs to control Florida and at least neutralize any threat posed by Cuba in order to protect its export facilities at the mouth of the Mississippi River, Mexico needs to control transit through the Gulf. Without the ability to project naval force into the most historically proven and geographically sound path of invasion, Mexico will never be a truly independent and secure nation-state.

The implication, of course, is that there is only room for one great power in North America, and as long as the United States dominates the naval approaches to the southern portion of the continent, Mexico must maintain a non-hostile relationship with the United States in order to secure its own territory.

However, if Mexico were able to control those territories itself, it would assure its physical security, and the next likely strategic goal would be to regain territory lost to the United States. Assuming it had the military capacity to secure and hold them, having the fertile valleys of California and the expansive range land of Texas would be a great boon to the income-strapped Mexican government. But security must come first, or Mexico would never be able to hold those territories.

Geopolitical Imperatives

(click here to enlarge image)

To secure its core:

* Mexico must first control and consolidate what can be labeled as the inner core, which includes both the highlands of Mexico City and the Veracruz coastal region. If these two regions cannot be wielded as a single zone, what we currently think of as Mexico will suffer from insufficient agricultural land and trade opportunities and will degenerate into an assortment of small, impoverished, sub-regional entities.
* Mexico must then control all pockets of potential dissent within the outer core territories that directly interact with the inner core, including Oaxaca, Chiapas, Guerrero and Michoacan. To do so, Mexico has two options: It can provide economic growth and employment opportunities to its citizens or it can rely on the rule of strongmen or a single strong party.
* Mexico must push north to control the wild northern territories from which threats might originate. The exact placement of the border is relatively academic, given the lack of clear geographic barriers. However, there is a cost-benefit ratio to take into account: The farther Mexico pushes north, the farther it must project power from its core, and the wider and less useful the plateau becomes.
* Mexico must control the sea approaches to its core as well as the chokepoints of the Caribbean in order to achieve absolute security. There are two phases to this. The first is the easiest, which is to control the Baja California and Yucatan peninsulas (modern Mexico has achieved this). The second is more difficult and requires gaining command of Cuba and Florida. Without these territories, Mexico has no choice but to engage in a subordinate relationship with the United States.
* Finally, with physical security ensured, Mexico can afford to reach past its buffer zones to richer territories and more useful coastlines — including the U.S. states of California, Texas and Louisiana.

Clearly, Mexico has not achieved all of its geopolitical imperatives. However, it has achieved just about all of the imperatives that it can without challenging the territorial integrity of the United States. There are also recurrent challenges to its economic stability and physical security, and Mexico still struggles to maintain the status quo on its second and third imperatives.

Economic Fundamentals

Sustained economic development has been a relentless challenge for Mexico. The root of Mexico’s slow development (compared to its northern neighbor) lies in its geographic challenges. Whereas the United States has a massive agricultural heartland divided by a highly navigable river, Mexico lacks both a concentrated breadbasket as well as a navigable river network. The geographic advantages of the United States have been rooted in the ease of transport. With the Mississippi River bisecting the U.S. agricultural heartland, access to international markets was incredible simple — and cost only as much as it took to build a boat. Mexico, by contrast, must invest a great deal of capital for every mile of road and rail network. During 300 years of ruling Mexico, the Spanish failed to develop any substantial transport networks, leaving the newly independent Mexico to start from scratch.

With insufficient transportation infrastructure in place, Mexico’s first decades of development were difficult. The cost of transporting goods from producing areas to consumer markets was prohibitive and reduced the profitability of private investment. Developing efficient transportation networks requires a massive amount of capital, right up front, which means that Mexico started out its independent statehood with no choice but to go deep into debt. Once Mexico is able to secure an influx of capital, however, it has generally been able to kick start growth sufficiently to sustain a substantial long-term expansion. But without its own domestic capital reserves (or particularly easy ways of developing them), Mexico’s development has been cyclical in nature, with great highs followed by crashes as resources deplete.

Since independence, there have been two major boom and bust cycles, starting with the rule of Mexican President Porfirio Diaz, who took power in 1880, at the end of the wars of independence, and remained in power until 1911 (a period referred to as the “Porfiriato”). In addition to seizing power and maintaining stability, Diaz was able to make substantial improvements to the country’s transportation network. With the help of a great deal of foreign investment, Diaz led a 30-year modernization push, including building Mexico’s railway system from scratch. The country’s rail network not only cut transportation costs drastically and made access to external markets easier, it also facilitated the extension of military power to the outer reaches of the country.

Unfortunately for Mexico, this period of growth and development slowed and was unable to translate foreign investment into overall welfare gains; capital collected in the hands of only a small segment of society. Political maneuvering by the elite, coupled with rising public discontent, eventually ousted Diaz from power in what evolved into the decade-long Mexican Revolution. But the railway infrastructure laid down during the Porfiriato became the foundation for post-revolutionary (and post-Great Depression) growth and development, once Mexico was able to access capital again.


(click here to enlarge image)

In the wake of the Great Depression and with the onset of World War II, Mexico experienced its second major influx of foreign capital. The government’s increased access to foreign lending was made possible by the renegotiation of outstanding debt (which, with the intervention of the United States on behalf of Mexico, was reduced by 90 percent) and the settlement of outstanding disputes with oil companies whose property had been seized in the oil nationalization project of 1938. Mexico was also aided by a boom in global demand for Mexican goods, particularly textile exports, as its northern neighbor went to war.

Renewed access to international capital markets and a surge in demand for exports catapulted Mexico into a five-year period of growth that averaged well over 6 percent per year. When the war ended, the export sector became less important for growth, but the five-year boost gave Mexico the industrial and developmental momentum it needed to continue growing through the 1950s and 1960s, albeit at a slower pace.

The 1970s told a slightly different story. With the oil price spike of the 1970s, European banks became flush with cash deposited by Middle Eastern countries. The resulting fall in interest rates encouraged developing countries around the world, and particularly in Latin America, to take out loans to finance industrialization projects. Mexico was no exception — the country was quick to take up debt in this period. Mexico’s discovery of major oil deposits in the late 1970s led to a sharp uptick in exports of oil — which jumped from a net worth of $500 million in 1976 to more than $13 billion in 1980. This led, in turn, to the optimistic belief that capital would always be cheap and oil prices always high. At this point it looked like Mexico would have a chance to complement a period of sustained growth with a brand new, and substantial, tranche of capital. This was not the case.

The collapse of oil prices in 1981 triggered a major devaluation of the Mexican peso, making it impossible for Mexico to make its debt payments on time. The resulting debt crisis of 1982 triggered a period of economic turmoil for Mexico — and the rest of the region — that is known simply as “the lost decade.” The International Monetary Fund (IMF) came to Mexico’s rescue with financing, preventing a debt default. However, Mexico struggled mightily to regain lost ground while at the same time meeting the IMF’s structural adjustment demands. Although stabilization was achieved for a few years, the policies enacted were insufficient. A severe overvaluation of the peso triggered a second financial hiccup in 1994 — the so-called “Tequila crisis.”

Since the revaluation of the peso in the wake of the Tequila crisis, Mexico has experienced moderate growth, averaging just over 3.5 percent between 1996 and 2008. Mexico’s modest growth rates have surprised observers, particularly given the fact that exports grew by an average of 11.1 percent per year between 1993 and 2003, which was facilitated by the enactment of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Despite this impressive performance in the export sector, Mexico’s growth has once again been impeded by a lack of capital. Low investment levels have not resulted from a lack of international investment interest, as foreign direct investment has increased dramatically, from less than $5 billion in 1993 to a high of nearly $30 billion in 2001. The capital shortage has instead come from the public sector, where spending has held steady at a relatively low level in the wake of the 1982 debt crisis. Furthermore, in the wake of the crisis and the privatization of the banking sector, lending to non-financial businesses fell by half from 1995 to 2007.

Mexico’s lack of capital investments has translated into an inability to sufficiently develop its own human capital resources. This lack of development is the main driver behind the constant flow of migration from Mexico to the United States, with Mexico’s labor market fortifying the U.S. labor pool and helping to underwrite the United States’ low-inflation growth. While workers in the United States do send back over $20 billion worth of remittances every year to Mexico — contributing to the overall growth of Mexico’s gross domestic product — it is difficult to determine if this money is being reinvested into Mexico in a way that contributes to growth in Mexican productivity.

This situation is being exacerbated by the decline of the energy industry. Income from Mexican state-owned energy company Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) accounts for 30 to 40 percent of the federal budget in any given year. With profits absorbed by the government for operating expenses, Pemex has very little spare cash to invest in its own industry, and the industry is facing serious declines in production. With prospective income headed downhill, Mexico is facing a grave fiscal problem — and the question will be whether to take the political risk of raising taxes or the financial risk of assuming greater amounts of debt. These energy woes are the most recent manifestation of Mexico’s boom-and-bust cycle of capital shortage.

Shifting Politics

Mexico is unique among countries in Latin America in that the seat of national power has been occupied for most of Mexico’s modern history by a single party: the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), or its historical antecedents. But despite the rule of a single entity, Mexico’s modern history has been relatively peaceful, avoiding (with some exceptions) the bloody political tangles that characterized many South American countries in the latter half of the 20th century.

This was in part possible because of the post-WWII prosperity that buoyed Mexico through the middle of the 20th century. In the context of sustained growth and sufficient capital, Mexican politicians didn’t need to do very much in order to keep the country on an even keel. The key to maintaining stability in a complex system characterized by a proliferation of interests — from business to farmers to unions — was a very strong party that used political inclusion to soothe all comers. This meant that, for the PRI, it made more sense to entice political opponents into inclusive political cooperation than it did to threaten them with force. The rule of the PRI was still authoritarian, but it was very gentle compared to the brutal dictatorships of the 1960s and 1970s in other Latin American countries.

The strength of the party, at least in large part, is a result of Mexico’s single-term limit for politicians. An idea that has been a rallying cry since the 19th century and was cemented by the Mexican Revolution, the edict that no politician should seek re-election is designed to avoid rulers who overstay their welcome.

The policy has had a number of consequences. It has made it difficult for individuals to build up their own power centers, or hold on to any single office for very long. The president can serve for only one six-year term — and for decades finding a successor was as simple as selecting an obvious heir. Theoretically designed to prevent despotism, the one-term limit also has made it very difficult to achieve standard goals of statehood — like economic or political reform. The primary problem is that Mexican politicians are not actually answerable to democratic processes. This creates an incentive structure that has very little to do with accountability to voters, and provides little to no incentive for politicians to achieve campaign promises.

Indeed, Mexican legislators often begin searching for their next job soon after entering office. And without the need to hold on to voter approval, Mexican politicians are much more free to engage in cronyism (something that helps with the job search). Indeed, in the politics of inclusion, this is actually quite beneficial. When the business of governance is dealt with through deal-making and favor distribution, having a system that leaves its legislators free to make such deals is conducive to the party’s strategy for power consolidation.

This structure is not, however, beneficial for setting a political trajectory, or enacting policy over the long term. Without any continuity in personnel, there is little to no institutional memory of legislative efforts. This allows Mexico to move forward only in short bursts of legislative action, if at all.

While these dynamics and PRI rule have shaped the foundation of modern Mexico’s political system, important shifts have occurred in the past decade. In 2000 the first elected president from the National Action Party — Vicente Fox — came into office. The transition of Mexico from a one-party system to a multiparty system pushed the country into relatively uncharted territory.

The dynamics of a multiparty system are different, with parties now able to openly oppose the will of the president in the legislature as a way of positioning themselves to propose candidates for the presidency. Though the system under the PRI was never particularly unified (nor in any way polite), all political maneuvering happened within the rubric of the PRI party machine, and dissent was relatively easy to control. Now such maneuvering occurs beyond that machine.

This dynamic is new, so it is too early to say how it will evolve, but the system appears to encourage political polarization in part because each party seeks to distinguish itself from the others. Additionally, as the inclusive framework used by the PRI to manage the country’s myriad interests breaks down, it will expose sharp regional and factional differences. The multiparty system has likely made Mexico a much more difficult country to rule, since the president now represents a swath of voters and doesn’t simply sit at the apex of a power balance held steady by a broad and inclusive effort.

Opportunities for divisiveness have flourished, and a willingness to break with past political arrangements has become clear. This is nowhere more evident than in the current administration’s decision to use the military to fight the power structures built and maintained for years by Mexico’s powerful criminal organizations.

Modern Challenges

Drugs

Like most of Mexico’s problems, the drug wars are also a result of the country’s geography. The flow of drugs is an ever-shifting river that follows the path of least resistance on its way from producer to consumer. When the United States and its international partners started shutting down direct air and sea traffic from Colombia to the United States in the 1990s, drug smugglers began to bring cocaine through the land corridor of Central America and Mexico. Mexico’s border with the United States became ground zero for drug smugglers, and Mexican organized crime found itself with a much larger portion of the drug money at its fingertips.

Both Mexico’s southern and northern borders are rugged and as populated as they are guarded (which is to say not much). This is the perfect combination for robust smuggling, particularly of goods that are in great demand in the United States. Since these border regions have few economic opportunities (the costs of development are simply too high and the state’s resources too few), this smuggling is met with the de facto participation, if not outright approval, of local authorities. Mexico’s fragmented geography also allowed plenty of room for different organizations to gain power in their local areas by controlling particular transport corridors or critical cities — even to the point of operating like a local government. These gangs jostled for control of territory and the state turned a blind eye.

But infighting and violence among drug smugglers did not go unnoticed, and as the political system shifted, so too did the rules of the drug game.

Under previous PRI governments, the need to keep local governments and power structures under the party umbrella meant that Mexico City ignored smuggling. That was the price of inclusion. Now that the government has shifted to an untested model, however, inclusion is not the only goal — and the model has become less predictable. The result has been the decision by Mexican President Felipe Calderon to deploy federal military forces to fight the influence and activities of the drug cartels throughout the country’s periphery. This war between the states and the smugglers has put Mexico at war with itself at many levels. In some ways, the drug war is simply a repeat of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920.

The end game for the cartel wars is unclear. As the violence continues, the government will have to choose between continuing a confrontational strategy against the cartels or returning to the old system of inclusive acquiescence, and any decision on the matter could very likely be forced by public opinion turning against the anti-cartel effort. As the military is exposed to the cartels, it will become increasingly vulnerable to corruption, reducing its effectiveness. The bottom line is that, as long as drugs are produced in South America and consumed in North America and Mexico’s borders remains porous (for the geographic reasons described above, this would be very difficult to change), the drug challenge will not go away. The challenge for Mexico is to decide when fighting the war on drugs is no longer concordant with its domestic political stability.

Energy

A direct result of Mexico’s more inclusive political system is that it is very difficult to make sharp changes in policy, which is a primary reason behind the country’s suffering energy sector. Because of the high costs of development, the state has never managed to implement policies that would promote growth — they would have too damaging an impact on the regional power balance. Oil proved to be a way around the distribution imbroglio.

Early costs were borne by foreign investors, assets were nationalized and the industry was seen as a free income stream for the state. But now those assets have been squeezed for everything they can produce, and Mexico requires a new wave of capital and technology — capital and technology it does not have — if it is to maintain its energy revenues.

The only option is to open up the industry to foreigners once again, but the 1917 constitution makes this illegal, and any attempt to change it would greatly upset powerful entrenched interests. Attempts at reform have so far fallen flat, and there is little to suggest that the country has the wherewithal to substantially change its energy policy.

Conclusion

Mexico is fundamentally challenged, first and foremost, by its physical geography. With mountain ranges for dissidents to hide in, expansive deserts that are difficult to control or defend and serious vulnerabilities to naval incursions, Mexico is inherently susceptible to serious security challenges. Throughout its history these threats have ranged from foreign invaders to leftist militants to upper-class rebels. Today’s drug-trafficking organizations are only the latest manifestation of this challenge.

The country’s rugged terrain lacks natural river transport networks, which makes it exceedingly difficult for Mexico to generate and accumulate capital. This leaves the country dependent on external capital and at the mercy of international market dynamics. Mexico shares an underdefended 2,000-mile-long border with the United States, the world’s largest consumer market. This leaves Mexico’s economy, which relies on the United States to import from Mexico everything from computers to drugs as well as to export to Mexico critical foodstuffs, highly dependent on the vagaries of the U.S. market. Mexico is also militarily reliant on the United States to defend Mexico’s vulnerable eastern flank, and thus is highly vulnerable to U.S. political influence.

In the face of all of these challenges, it is no surprise that Mexico has remained embattled and underdeveloped compared its northern neighbor. Even before addressing issues arising at a political and policy level, Mexico must overcome the challenges of its physical geography.



Última edición por ZaMaCoNa el Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:11 pm, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 3:55 pm

Este es sobre los migrantes, habla de lo que digo que los zetas muestran que estan teniendo problemas de flujo.....

Mexico: Revelations From 72 Migrants' Deaths
August 27, 2010 | 1323 GMT
PRINTPRINT Text Resize:
ShareThis

Mexico: Revelations From 72 Migrants' Deaths
STR/AFP/Getty Images
The bodies of some of the 72 presumed migrants killed in San Fernando, Tamaulipas state, on Aug. 25

Members of the Mexican military discovered the bodies of 72 men and women in an abandoned building on a ranch 22 kilometers (14 miles) outside of San Fernando, Tamaulipas state, the evening of Aug. 24. A man suffering from gunshot wounds notified Mexican marines manning a roadside checkpoint near the abandoned ranch building of the location of the bodies and what had happened to him. The Ecuadorian migrant said he was on a truck with 72 other migrants (58 men and 14 women) from Brazil, Costa Rica, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala traveling toward the U.S.-Mexico border when members of Los Zetas intercepted the vehicle. The immigrants were taken to the abandoned ranch building and asked if they wanted to work for Los Zetas as hit men for the group or as cooks and maids. The migrants were promptly shot in the back of the head when they refused. The Ecuadorian man survived because when he was shot the bullet entered his neck and exited through his jaw. He played dead, managed to escape and stumbled to the marine checkpoint. The Mexican marines initially believed the injured man was part of an elaborate setup for an ambush. However, after a reconnaissance flight over the area drew ground fire, the Mexican marines mounted an operation and raided the location. One marine and three members of Los Zetas were killed in the subsequent firefight.

While still an incredibly potent and powerful organization, this incident is indicative of the current and seemingly desperate state of Los Zetas in terms of manpower and human resources. The incident has also brought renewed attention to Los Zetas’ human-smuggling operations and provides an opportunity to examine the success of the group’s expanding enterprises despite the organization’s losing control over its home territory.

The Los Zetas organization has been locked in a battle for control of the northeastern Mexico trafficking corridor with an alliance of its rivals, the New Federation (Gulf Cartel, Sinaloa Federation and La Familia Michoacana). The organization also been the target of several Mexican military and law enforcement operations that have decimated the senior leadership and operational capability of the organization over the past several months. When fighting between the Zetas and the New Federation broke out in the first few months of 2010, several open-source reports indicated the group had called in a tremendous number of operatives from other regions of Mexico to act as reinforcements. Soon after, reports began to emerge of Central American gang members (who work with Los Zetas in their home countries) being called upon by the Los Zetas organization to aid in the fight in northeastern Mexico, indicating a significant lack of manpower. This latest incident shows a continued desperation for manpower and ability to put boots on the ground to defend Los Zetas’ home territory. Additionally, news of the deaths of nearly all those that refused to work for the Zetas will undoubtedly reverberate throughout the migrant community and could, perhaps, influence others if and when they encounter Los Zetas on their journey to the United States.

Mexico: Revelations From 72 Migrants' Deaths
(click here to enlarge image)

Los Zetas members have been involved in the human smuggling trade for several years now. The organization carries tremendous influence throughout the east coast of Mexico from its southern to northern borders. The organization’s area of influence not only lies along traditional migrant routes from Central and South America but also serves as one of the main overland drug trafficking routes to the United States from the Andean region of South America. Los Zetas’ human-smuggling operations have been a point of contention with other drug trafficking organizations in Mexico and, to a limited extent, an element of the current conflict taking place in northeastern Mexico. Organizations like the Sinaloa Federation and the Gulf cartel have expressed their “displeasure” with Los Zetas’ level of involvement in the human-smuggling business as it reportedly disgraces the prestige of the drug-trafficking business. While these other organizations can be linked to human smuggling in some fashion, it is not an integral part of their operations as they focus nearly all their efforts on trafficking drugs.

However, Los Zetas’ inroads into the human-smuggling arena have proved to be profitable and have helped the group become a truly international trafficking organization. The Los Zetas organization has been known to collect $2,000 to $10,000 per migrant (depending on nationality), making human smuggling an extremely lucrative business. Additionally, with the steady flow of migrants coming from Central and South America, Los Zetas members have been able to forge relationships with other criminal groups in these countries. This has helped the group expand its human smuggling operations as well as its influence in the drug trafficking realm while gaining greater control of the drug supply chain.

While the Los Zetas organization has been able to successfully expand its influence and operations deeper into Central and South America due in large part to heavy involvement in human-smuggling operations, the incident in Tamaulipas state and the ultimatums that these 73 immigrants were presented with shows a certain level of desperation within the group. This desperation is perhaps an indicator of the current status of the Los Zetas organization in the broader war with the New Federation and its allies for control of northeastern Mexico.




Última edición por ZaMaCoNa el Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:12 pm, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Chalchipinke
Moderador
Moderador


Mensajes : 2190
Fecha de inscripción : 14/04/2010
Localización : Tejuino & Moist Food's Land

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 3:57 pm

'che zama... tas bien wey si piensas que voy a leer eso...

Escribe una sintesis...no seas cabrón

_________________
"Cuando advierta que para producir necesita obtener autorización de quienes no producen nada; cuando compruebe que el dinero fluye hacia quienes trafican no bienes, sino favores; cuando perciba que muchos se hacen ricos por el soborno y por influencias más que por el trabajo, y que las leyes no lo protegen contra ellos sino, por el contrario, son ellos los que están protegidos contra usted; cuando repare que la corrupción es recompensada y la honradez se convierte en un autosacrificio, entonces podrá afirmar, sin temor a equivocarse, que su sociedad está condenada"
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:05 pm

uno sobre los pinches secuestros de los zetas, me llama la atencion que segun los analistas "empiezan a busscar mas entradas" cando tienen meses secustrando a lo bestia y jodiendo a medio mundo por lana, se que se puede poner peor pero estamos casi casi en lo mas pinche.

Mexico: Los Zetas and the Kidnapping Threat in Monterrey
August 25, 2010 | 1201 GMT
PRINTPRINT Text Resize:
ShareThis

Mexico: Los Zetas and the Kidnapping Threat in Monterrey
DARIO LEON/AFP/Getty Images
Kidnapping victims rescued from alleged drug traffickers north of Monterrey, Mexico
Summary

The U.S. Consulate in Monterrey, Mexico, posted a Warden Message on Aug. 23 regarding an Aug. 20 gunbattle. Mexican authorities have denied reports that the incident emerged from a kidnapping attempt on a student. Whatever the cause of the battle, the risk of falling victim to extortion or kidnapping in the Monterrey region will increase as the drug trafficking organization Los Zetas finds itself under increased pressure from the Mexican government and its cartel rivals. The Zetas’ tactical expertise and military background will present enormous challenges even to the most prepared individuals, teams and organizations anticipating potential kidnappings.
Analysis

The U.S. Consulate in Monterrey, Mexico, posted a Warden Message on Aug. 23 regarding an Aug. 20 firefight outside the American School Foundation of Monterrey (ASFM) in the upscale suburb of Santa Catarina that initially appeared to be a kidnapping attempt.

Mexican authorities have denied initial reports that the incident represented a kidnapping attempt on a student at the school, and the evidence suggests the confrontation was the result of mistaken identity. Still, the risk of falling victim to extortion or kidnapping in the Monterrey region — particularly among the wealthy — will continue to increase as the drug trafficking organization Los Zetas increasingly finds itself against the wall.

The Aug. 20 incident arose when an executive protection (EP) team from Fomento Economico Mexicano, S.A., (FEMSA) was conducting routine surveillance around the ASFM facilities around noon local time. At that point, a group of armed men in two vans arrived and accused the FEMSA EP team of working for a rival cartel. When the FEMSA EP team denied the accusations and radioed for backup, a firefight erupted between the two groups. Two FEMSA EP agents died and three others were injured in the gunbattle, while four EP agents were taken hostage. The four agents were released the morning of Aug. 21 after their captors verified their identities, indicating that the armed group in fact was not targeting the FEMSA EP team.

Still, the incident has tapped into ongoing fears in Mexico about kidnapping. With pressure from both Mexican security forces and rival groups, some Mexican organized criminal groups have moved into activities like kidnapping and extortion to supplement their income. Although kidnapping and extortion rackets are hardly new to the Monterrey area, businesses and citizens in the area would be wise to be on the lookout for signs of increasing kidnapping and extortion operations. Monterrey is a target rich environment for kidnapping-for-ransom operations. Many of Mexico’s wealthy industrial elite call Monterrey home, and several of Latin America’s largest corporations are also based in Monterrey or have major operations there.


Mexico: Los Zetas and the Kidnapping Threat in Monterrey
(click here to enlarge image)

The deteriorating security situation in Monterrey has resulted from the ongoing conflict between Los Zetas and the New Federation, an alliance between the Sinaloa Federation, the Gulf cartel and La Familia Michoacana. The conflict began in late January 2010 along the Texas-Mexico border region and had spread to the Monterrey metropolitan region by early spring.

As the conflict progressed through the spring and summer months, Los Zetas appeared to remain on the losing end of a New Federation and Mexican military/law enforcement offensive. According to several open source reports, Los Zetas lost its foothold in the Reynosa and Matamoros areas. Additionally, the New Federation has increasingly challenged Los Zetas for control of traditional Zeta strongholds like Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey. Mexican military and law enforcement operations in the Monterrey region have proven particularly damaging to senior Zeta leadership in Monterrey.

The Zeta leader in Monterrey, Hector “El Tori” Raul Luna Luna, was captured in a Mexican military operation June 9. Less than a month later, Hector’s brother, Esteban “El Chachis” Luna Luna — who had taken over the leadership position in Monterrey — was captured in yet another Mexican military operation July 7. A senior lieutenant within the Los Zetas organization known only as “El Sonrics” was chosen to be the third leader in Monterrey in as many months after the arrest of Esteban Luna Luna. El Sonrics’ tenure lasted about as long as his predecessor, however, as he was killed in a firefight with members of the Mexican military in Monterrey on Aug. 14 along with three other members of Los Zetas acting as his bodyguards. In addition to losing several key members of its leadership, Mexican authorities have seized several large weapons caches belonging to Los Zetas, killing and arresting numerous lower level Zeta operatives during the course of those seizures and during other law enforcement and military operations.

With increasing pressure from both Mexican security forces and the New Federation, Los Zetas is losing control of its mainstay drug income and having to fight a battle for territory. This has required a tremendous amount of resources and cash, making it increasingly likely that Los Zetas will expand its kidnapping and extortion operations — especially in the Monterrey region — to regenerate income flows.

Other Mexican criminal organizations have followed similar operational models, such as the Arellano Felix organization (AFO), aka the Tijuana cartel, and the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes organization, aka the Juarez cartel. After suffering major setbacks to their leadership in the late 1990s and early 2000s, including the deaths or arrests of six of the seven brothers of the Arellano Felix family, AFO factions turned to kidnapping and extortion to supplement their income, which had flagged due to an inability to traffic drugs. The decision of the Teodoro “El Teo” Garcia Simental faction of the AFO to pursue kidnapping and extortion proved a breaking point within the AFO, however. The Arellano Felix family denounced the practice, saying that it turned the population against the organization, and Garcia went on to align his faction with the Sinaloa organization.

Similarly, the Juarez cartel increasingly has turned to kidnapping and extortion as it has felt the pinch from the large deployment of Mexican security forces to Juarez and northern Chihuahua state as well as from the Sinaloa federation’s offensive for control of the Juarez region. Juarez business owners are frequently required to pay “cuotas,” or extortion payments, to the VCF enforcement arm, La Linea — or risk having their businesses set on fire or having their employees kidnapped or even executed. With increasing frequency, this has forced Juarez business owners to shut down.

Previous Zeta kidnapping operations in the Monterrey region have been operational or political in nature aimed at facilitating the group’s trafficking operations. Its victims included government officials and other participants in the Mexican drug trade. Thus, the Monterrey Transit and Roads secretaries were kidnapped from their homes May 31 in response to new policies they had implemented.

Now, the Zetas’ target set appears to have shifted along the lines of the Tijuana and Juarez cartels and toward local business owners in a bid for economic gain. In two such incidents, a used car salesman was kidnapped Aug. 18 as he arrived at his car lot and armed men posing as bakery employees kidnapped the owner of a pawnshop Aug. 8.

Ultimately, kidnapping operations in Monterrey targeting local business executives will likely increase as the Zetas become increasingly desperate. As the Mexican government and cartel rivals continue to pressure Los Zetas, business owners and private citizens should be on the lookout for certain signals and indicators to help avoid increased Zeta kidnapping and extortion operations. Like any major criminal organization in Mexico, Los Zetas will conduct hostile surveillance of a target before launching any sort of extortion or kidnapping operations. Situational awareness and comprehensive countersurveillance programs can help identify hostile surveillance of a business or a high net-worth individual, alerting possible targets of potential criminal aggression to take the necessary actions to thwart an attack.

Although measures to thwart kidnapping operations, such as the employment of an executive protection team and a comprehensive countersurveillance program, are quite helpful, organizations like Los Zetas backed into a corner have shown themselves to be incredibly resourceful. The organization’s tactical expertise and military background will thus present enormous challenges even to the most prepared individuals, teams and organizations.




Última edición por ZaMaCoNa el Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:12 pm, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:06 pm

Chalchipinke escribió:
'che zama... tas bien wey si piensas que voy a leer eso...

Escribe una sintesis...no seas cabrón

son puro copy paste carnal, esta de hueva pero si me lo pides bonito te lo resumo............


Última edición por ZaMaCoNa el Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:12 pm, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:06 pm

el reporte de seguridad de agosto 23 para mexico

Mexico Security Memo: Aug. 23, 2010
August 23, 2010 | 2017 GMT
PRINTPRINT Text Resize:
ShareThis

Mexico Security Memo: Aug. 23, 2010

The Kidnapping and Murder of Edelmiro Cavazos Leal

In the early-morning hours of Aug. 16, five to seven SUVs bearing the symbols and colors of the now-defunct Mexican Federal Judicial Police arrived at the house of Edelmiro Cavazos Leal, mayor of Santiago, Nuevo Leon state, with their emergency lights flashing. Surveillance video from Cavasos’ home shows the mayor walking outside to investigate, at which point about 15 armed men exit the vehicles. Soon after, Cavasos is shown entering one of the vehicles at gunpoint, and the vehicles promptly exit Cavasos’ driveway.

The attorney general of Nuevo Leon state, Alejandro Garza y Garza, confirmed 12 hours later that Cavasos was missing. Cavasos’ body was found Aug. 18, gagged and handcuffed along a highway outside of Santiago. The Nuevo Leon State Investigative Agency raided a Santiago safe-house Aug. 19, arresting six Santiago Municipal Police officers (including the officer who had been assigned to guard Cavasos’ home at the time of his abduction), a transit official and four unnamed cartel hit men. Seventeen other individuals were able to evade capture.

The tactics in Cavasos’ abduction have been widely used throughout Mexico for several years. The use of clone law enforcement and military vehicles, clothing and equipment cloaks criminal elements’ illicit activities under an ostensibly legitimate cover, giving them a tactical advantage over their intended targets. The ambiguity created by the use of cloned equipment poses a tough situation for citizens that must choose between obeying apparent police and fleeing from them. It also creates difficulties for legitimate authorities responding to incidents.

In addition to cloned equipment, there are often active law enforcement personnel involved in many of these cartel-related activities, further complicating an already murky situation. For instance, in the widely publicized June 2008 abduction of 14-year-old Fernando Marti, his captors, some of whom were Federal Investigative Agency (AFI) agents, set up a fake roadblock, forcing Marti and his driver into a choke point to carry out the abduction.

Santiago is a suburb outside Mexico’s industrial capital, Monterrey, where many of the city’s wealthy have weekend homes. Monterrey saw relatively low levels of cartel-related violence before the January 2010 rupture in relations between Los Zetas and the group’s former partner, the Gulf Cartel. Since then, cartel violence has risen in the region, prompting many leading political and business officials to call for an increase in federal security forces — with some even calling for a battalion-sized deployment of Mexican army and Marine troops. The federal government deployed 150 Federal Police support agents to the Monterrey metro area Aug. 19, a day after Cavasos was found dead. However, with only around 300 cartel-related deaths since the beginning of 2010, violence in the greater Monterrey region remains relatively minor compared with areas such as the Culiacan-Navolato region of Sinaloa state and Juarez, Chihuahua state, each of which has seen more than 1,000 cartel-related deaths this year.

U.S. Citizen Killed in Guerrero State

The body of 35-year-old Joseph Steven Proctor of Georgia was found in a red Ford Windstar minivan approximately 14 kilometers (8.6 miles) outside of Acapulco, Guerrero state, along Mexican Federal Highway Acapulco-Zihuatanejo at around 2 a.m. local time Aug. 22. A Mexican army lieutenant told police Proctor opened fire on an army patrol in the region with an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle and the patrol was forced to return fire in self-defense, killing Proctor. However, the fact that the military patrol left the scene and did not alert local law enforcement authorities about the incident is highly suspicious, as Mexican law enforcement reportedly learned of Proctor’s body’s location from an anonymous tip phoned in.

Proctor had reportedly been living in Mexico intermittently for approximately six years along with a girlfriend and his son and was going through a divorce in Georgia. Proctor is believed to have moved to western Guerrero state only four months earlier from Puebla state in central Mexico, and was last seen by his girlfriend the evening of Aug. 21, when he left his home to make a quick drive to a nearby corner store. He had reportedly mentioned to his father that he was annoyed by Mexican police pulling him over in order solicit bribes in exchange for avoiding traffic tickets, which would indicate some animosity toward the forces that may have played out in a deadly manner on the night of his disappearance.

The Mexican military has been known to fire at civilians if they do not comply with orders to stop at check points and roadblocks the military has set up, as it is a common tactic of organized criminal groups to refuse to yield at checkpoints in attempts to avoid coming in contact with Mexican security forces. While the circumstances surrounding Proctor’s death are murky given the discontinuity of reports from Mexican law enforcement and the Mexican military, given Proctor’s reported past annoyances with Mexican security forces and the history of the Mexican military firing upon drivers who refuse to yield, it is very possible Proctor was killed in this manner.


Mexico Security Memo: Aug. 23, 2010
(click here to view interactive map)

Aug. 16

* Police found the charred body of the federal police commander of Cosamaloapan, Veracruz state, in the municipality of Manlio Fabio Altamirano, Veracruz state.
* Guards discovered the bodies of five prisoners in the Culiacan, Sinaloa state prison. Four of the victims had their throats slit.
* The body of an unidentified man was discovered in an abandoned vehicle in Zapopan, Jalisco state. The victim had been shot in the head.

Aug. 17

* Federal agents arrested three suspected extortionists allegedly linked to La Familia Michoacana (LFM) in the municipality of Lazaro Cardenas, Michoacan state.
* Soldiers arrested five suspected criminals during a raid on a house in Zapopan, Jalisco state. Authorities seized several firearms and ammunition along with a small amount of marijuana.
* The dismembered body of an unidentified man was discovered in the Toluquilla neighborhood of Tlaquepaque, Jalisco state. A message was reportedly discovered near several plastic bags containing the body parts.

Aug. 18

* Three decapitated bodies were discovered in the municipality of Los Ramones, Nuevo Leon state. The captors reportedly tortured the victims before killing them.
* Unidentified attackers threw grenades at a printing shop and a gas station in the municipalities of Santa Catarina and Apodaca, Nuevo Leon state, respectively. In both attacks, the grenades failed to detonate.
* Five policemen were injured in a grenade attack by unidentified attackers in the municipality of Pueblo Viejo, Veracruz state.

Aug. 19

* Soldiers seized 1,650 kilograms of marijuana in two separate incidents during military patrols in the municipalities of Miguel Aleman and Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state.
* Three decapitated bodies were discovered in the Burgos neighborhood of Temixco, Morelos state. One of the victims was tentatively identified as a Temixco municipal police officer and another allegedly worked at a private security firm. A message claiming the crime was an act of revenge was found near the bodies.
* Police in the municipality of Apaseo el Alto, Guanajuato state, arrested two suspected kidnappers allegedly linked to LFM.
* Unidentified gunmen attacked Judge Carlos Alberto Elorza Amores in the municipality of Xalisco, Nayarit state, killing one of his bodyguards. Elorza is overseeing a criminal case against former Quintana Roo state gubernatorial candidate Greg Sanchez.

Aug. 20

* Police arrested three kidnappers and freed a kidnapping victim at a bank in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon state. The suspects drove the victim to the bank to withdraw funds for his release.
* Soldiers arrested four suspects during a raid in Santiago, Nuevo Leon state. Authorities seized several rifles and a rocket launcher during the incident, in which up to 17 additional suspects are believed to have escaped.
* The body of an unidentified man bearing two gunshot wounds to the head was discovered in Naucalpan, Mexico state. A message attributing the crime to La Resistencia was found near the body.

Aug. 21

* Unidentified gunmen killed a Secretariat of Public Security protection services official, identified as Jose Murillo Espinoza, in Culiacan, Sinaloa state. Three of Murillo Espinoza’s bodyguards were killed during the attack and three other persons were injured.
* Unidentified gunmen killed a witness set to testify against the La Flor kidnapping gang during an attack on a bar in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City.

Aug. 22

* Unidentified gunmen abandoned two injured private security guards in a vehicle in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon state. The bodies of two other guards were discovered in the trunk of the vehicle.
* The dismembered bodies of four men were discovered hanging from a bridge in Cuernavaca, Morelos state. A message was found near the victims, who had been kidnapped Aug. 21 in the municipalities of Jiutepec and Cuernavaca, Morelos state.





Última edición por ZaMaCoNa el Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:13 pm, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:07 pm

el reporte de seguridad de mexico de agosto 16


Mexico Security Memo: Aug. 16, 2010
August 16, 2010 | 2123 GMT
PRINTPRINT Text Resize:
ShareThis

Mexico Security Memo: Aug. 23, 2010
Televisa Grenade Attacks

Members of Los Zetas attacked the local television affiliates of the Televisa media company in Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, and Monterrey, Nuevo Leon state, late Aug. 14 and early Aug. 15. The attackers used hand grenades in the Monterrey attack and 40 mm grenade launchers in Matamoros. The attacks reportedly caused minor damage to both buildings and injuries in Monterrey, where paramedics examined two people who received superficial wounds inside the Televisa station.

The Televisa Matamoros station, located on the corner of Manuel Cavazos Lerma Boulevard and Calle Fresno in the Paseo Residencial colony, was attacked first, at around 9 p.m. local time Aug. 14. An unknown number of armed men reportedly fired upon the building with a grenade launcher from a nearby pedestrian bridge. A grenade detonated near the second story of the building, causing minor damage to building’s facade. The Televisa Monterrey building, located on Calle Albino Esparza, was attacked at approximately 1:15 a.m. local time Aug. 15. A member of Los Zetas traveling in a pickup truck reportedly threw a fragmentation hand grenade as the truck passed near the building’s entrance. The grenade detonated under a Toyota Tacoma that was parked along the street, causing significant damage to the Tacoma and minor structural damage to the front of the Televisa building. The windows were blown out of a photography studio across the street from the Televisa Monterrey building.

This is the third known attack on the Televisa Monterrey building that Los Zetas have conducted in the past two years. The same facilities were attacked with gunfire and a fragmentation grenade the night of Oct. 12, 2008 — the same night of an attack on the U.S. Consulate. Then on Jan. 6, 2009, the same tactics were employed in another attack on the Televisa building, though a narcomanta was left at the scene saying in Spanish, “Stop reporting on us. Also report on narco officials. This is a warning.”

The morning of Aug. 14, members of the Mexican military reportedly shot and killed the leader of Los Zetas in Monterrey, known only as “El Sonrics,” and three other members of Los Zetas in a car chase and firefight in southern Monterrey, though there has been no official confirmation of the incident. (El Sonrics is thought to have taken over as leader of Los Zetas in Monterrey after Hector “El Tori” Luna Luna and his brother, Esteban “El Chachis” Luna Luna, were captured by Mexican military forces in June and July, respectively.) As the firefight reportedly began, up to 13 major intersections in the Monterrey metropolitan area reportedly were blocked off by members of Los Zetas, who had hijacked vehicles and positioned them in the middle of the intersections. This is a common tactic that Los Zetas use when a high-value member of the organization is under pressure or has been captured by Mexican security officials. It is currently unclear if El Sonrics’ reported death is directly related to the attacks on the Televisa Monterrey and Matamoros locations, but Televisa’s coverage of the firefight earlier in the day could have provoked a retaliatory attack from Los Zetas.

Televisa is the largest media conglomerate in Latin America outside of Brazil. It has perhaps the largest viewing audience throughout Mexico and therefore shapes the perception of millions of Mexican citizens. This degree of influence makes Televisa an obvious target as criminal groups seek to manipulate the coverage of organized crime-related incidents. Televisa has been the focus of several organized crime-related attacks; most recently, a Televisa news crew was kidnapped in Durango state July 26 by members of the Sinaloa cartel under orders from its leader, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera, to force the crew to broadcast prepared messages, photographs and videos from the Sinaloa cartel. The crew was rescued by a Federal Police operation July 31. The July 26 kidnapping and these recent attacks in Monterrey and Matamoros underscore a recognition by the cartels of the amount of influence Televisa coverage on their activities has and their willingness to attempt to influence and coerce certain aspects of that coverage.
Federal Police Hunt ‘La Barbie’

Nearly 300 Mexican Federal Police agents, with support from a helicopter, launched a series of raids on luxury apartment buildings in the Bosque de Las Lomas colony of western Mexico City in search of former Beltran Leyva Organization (BLO) enforcer Edgar “La Barbie” Valdez Villarreal the afternoon of Aug. 9. Valdez, a U.S. citizen, has been locked in a heated battle with former BLO lieutenant and current Cartel Pacifico Sur leader Hector “El H” Beltran Leyva over territory that was under BLO control before the death of BLO leader Arturo Beltran Leyva in December 2009 — primarily in Morelos, Mexico and Guerrero states.

The operation targeting Valdez is similar to other large operations that netted other high-value cartel targets like Teodoro “El Teo” Garcia Simental. The Aug. 9 operation indicates that Mexican intelligence and security forces are closing in on Valdez, and the most wanted U.S. citizen in Mexico could be captured in the very near future. An operation like this likely would not have been organized without ample, time-sensitive, actionable intelligence on Valdez’s exact location. Cartel figures’ organizational rivals often provide such information to authorities, and Valdez has plenty of rivals.


(click here to view interactive map)

Aug. 9

* Unidentified gunmen ambushed a prison transport vehicle in Tlaltizapan, Morelos state, killing a prisoner. A guard was killed and another was injured during the attack.
* Two dismembered bodies were discovered in trash bags in Amecameca, Mexico state. The victims’ eyes had been taped shut and a message signed with the initials “FM” was discovered near the bodies.

Aug. 10

* Police freed a kidnapping victim and arrested two suspected kidnappers from a residence in the Sagitario II neighborhood of Ecatepec, Mexico state.
* Police discovered two severed legs believed to belong to a woman’s body floating near a dike in Toluca, Mexico state.
* Colima state Gov. Mario Anguiano Moreno said that the deaths of three policemen in Manzanillo, Colima state, could be due to a local power struggle between La Familia Michoacana and the Nuevo Milenio cartel. Anguiano Moreno cited the testimony of suspects in custody to back his claims.

Aug. 11

* Soldiers freed four kidnapping victims held in a residence in southern Monterrey, Nuevo Leon state.
* Five people were killed on a ranch in Villa Ahumada, Chihuahua state. The victims had all been shot to death, and shell casings of various calibers were found near the bodies.
* Unidentified gunmen killed the nephew of former National Action Party leader Manuel Espino in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state. The victim, identified as Hugo Francisco Zamora Ochoa, was killed in a parking lot as he entered his vehicle.

Aug. 12

* Unidentified gunmen kidnapped a man and a woman from their residence in the Barrio del Parque neighborhood of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon state. The attackers reportedly shot at the house for approximately 30 minutes before leaving with the two victims.

Aug. 13

* Police arrested five suspects allegedly linked to the kidnappings of three journalists in Durango state. The suspects, who are allegedly members of the Sinaloa cartel, were arrested in Ciudad Lerdo, Durango state.
* Hector Alvarez Sandoval, the lead homicide investigator of the municipal police in Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes state, was assassinated as he sat inside his vehicle outside his home.

Aug. 14

* Around 300 Federal Police support agents arrived in Gomez Palacio and Ciudad Lerdo, Durango state, bringing the total number of Federal Police in the Comarca Lagunera region to nearly 500.
* Federal Police detained four members of the Los Fabila kidnapping group in simultaneous operations in Guanajuato state.
* A brief firefight erupted in north Morelia, Michoacan state, resulting in the death of one man. Reports indicate that the victim was able to wound two of his attackers.

Aug. 15

* A group of Los Zetas hit men reportedly killed seven people in the Los Altos region of Jalisco state before returning to Zacatecas state.
* U.S. Custom and Border Protection officials seized a total of 136 kilograms (nearly 300 pounds) of cocaine from a Dodge Nitro attempting to cross the Reynosa-Hidalgo International Bridge along the Tamaulipas state-Texas border.
* The bodies of six men were found in the back of a pickup truck in the small village of Tierra Alta near the Oaxaca-Veracruz state line. Two of the victims had single gunshot wounds to the back of the head, and the other four were reported to have had several gunshot wounds across their bodies.





Última edición por ZaMaCoNa el Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:13 pm, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:10 pm

chalch es una pagina de suscripcion, no puedo ponerles links y resumirlo pues no se vale (aunque si quiiieeerreeess....)
mas que todo se enfoca a pedos de seguridad y hay varios articulos bien chingones de seguridad personal y mas mamadas, ahi los voy a ir subiendo mientras siga con la suscripcion.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 4:11 pm

este articulo esta chingon, habla sobre los estados de alerta


A Primer on Situational Awareness
June 10, 2010 | 0856 GMT
PRINTPRINT Text Resize:
ShareThis


A Closer Look at India's Naxalite Threat



The world is a wonderful place, but it can also be a dangerous one. In almost every corner of the globe militants of some political persuasion are plotting terror attacks — and these attacks can happen in London or New York, not just in Peshawar or Baghdad. Meanwhile, criminals operate wherever there are people, seeking to steal, rape, kidnap or kill.

Regardless of the threat, it is very important to recognize that criminal and terrorist attacks do not materialize out of thin air. In fact, quite the opposite is true. Criminals and terrorists follow a process when planning their actions, and this process has several distinct steps. This process has traditionally been referred to as the “terrorist attack cycle,” but if one looks at the issue thoughtfully, it becomes apparent that the same steps apply to nearly all crimes. Of course, there will be more time between steps in a complex crime like a kidnapping or car bombing than there will be between steps in a simple crime such as purse-snatching or shoplifting, where the steps can be completed quite rapidly. Nevertheless, the same steps are usually followed.

People who practice situational awareness can often spot this planning process as it unfolds and then take appropriate steps to avoid the dangerous situation or prevent it from happening altogether. Because of this, situational awareness is one of the key building blocks of effective personal security — and when exercised by large numbers of people, it can also be an important facet of national security. Since situational awareness is so important, and because we discuss situational awareness so frequently in our analyses, we thought it would be helpful to discuss the subject in detail and provide a primer that can be used by people in all sorts of situations.

Foundations

First and foremost, it needs to be noted that being aware of one’s surroundings and identifying potential threats and dangerous situations is more of a mindset than a hard skill. Because of this, situational awareness is not something that can be practiced only by highly trained government agents or specialized corporate security countersurveillance teams. Indeed, it can be exercised by anyone with the will and the discipline to do so.

An important element of the proper mindset is to first recognize that threats exist. Ignorance or denial of a threat — or completely tuning out one’s surroundings while in a public place — makes a person’s chances of quickly recognizing the threat and avoiding it slim to none. This is why apathy, denial and complacency can be (and often are) deadly. A second important element is understanding the need to take responsibility for one’s own security. The resources of any government are finite and the authorities simply cannot be everywhere and cannot stop every criminal action. The same principle applies to private security at businesses or other institutions, like places of worship. Therefore, people need to look out for themselves and their neighbors.

Another important facet of this mindset is learning to trust your “gut” or intuition. Many times a person’s subconscious can notice subtle signs of danger that the conscious mind has difficulty quantifying or articulating. Many people who are victimized frequently experience such feelings of danger prior to an incident, but choose to ignore them. Even a potentially threatening person not making an immediate move — or even if the person wanders off quickly after a moment of eye contact — does not mean there was no threat.

Levels of Awareness
A Primer on Situational Awareness

People typically operate on five distinct levels of awareness. There are many ways to describe these levels (“Cooper’s colors,” for example, which is a system frequently used in law enforcement and military training), but perhaps the most effective way to illustrate the differences between the levels is to compare them to the different degrees of attention we practice while driving. For our purposes here we will refer to the five levels as “tuned out;” “relaxed awareness;” “focused awareness;” “high alert” and “comatose.”

The first level, tuned out, is like when you are driving in a very familiar environment or are engrossed in thought, a daydream, a song on the radio or even by the kids fighting in the backseat. Increasingly, cell phone calls and texting are also causing people to tune out while they drive. Have you ever gotten into the car and arrived somewhere without even really thinking about your drive there? If so, then you’ve experienced being tuned out.

The second level of awareness, relaxed awareness, is like defensive driving. This is a state in which you are relaxed but you are also watching the other cars on the road and are looking well ahead for potential road hazards. If another driver looks like he may not stop at the intersection ahead, you tap your brakes to slow your car in case he does not. Defensive driving does not make you weary, and you can drive this way for a long time if you have the discipline to keep yourself at this level, but it is very easy to slip into tuned-out mode. If you are practicing defensive driving you can still enjoy the trip, look at the scenery and listen to the radio, but you cannot allow yourself to get so engrossed in those distractions that they exclude everything else. You are relaxed and enjoying your drive, but you are still watching for road hazards, maintaining a safe following distance and keeping an eye on the behavior of the drivers around you.

The next level of awareness, focused awareness, is like driving in hazardous road conditions. You need to practice this level of awareness when you are driving on icy or slushy roads — or the roads infested with potholes and erratic drivers that exist in many third-world countries. When you are driving in such an environment, you need to keep two hands on the wheel at all times and have your attention totally focused on the road and the other drivers. You don’t dare take your eyes off the road or let your attention wander. There is no time for cell phone calls or other distractions. The level of concentration required for this type of driving makes it extremely tiring and stressful. A drive that you normally would not think twice about will totally exhaust you under these conditions because it demands your prolonged and total concentration.

The fourth level of awareness is high alert. This is the level that induces an adrenaline rush, a prayer and a gasp for air all at the same time — “Watch out! There’s a deer in the road! Hit the brakes!” This also happens when that car you are watching doesn’t stop at the stop sign and pulls out right in front of you. High alert can be scary, but at this level you are still able to function. You can hit your brakes and keep your car under control. In fact, the adrenalin rush you get at this stage can sometimes even aid your reflexes. But, the human body can tolerate only short periods of high alert before becoming physically and mentally exhausted.

The last level of awareness, comatose, is what happens when you literally freeze at the wheel and cannot respond to stimuli, either because you have fallen asleep, or, at the other end of the spectrum, because you are petrified from panic. It is this panic-induced paralysis that concerns us most in relation to situational awareness. The comatose level of awareness (or perhaps more accurately, lack of awareness) is where you go into shock, your brain ceases to process information and you simply cannot react to the reality of the situation. Many times when this happens, a person can go into denial, believing that “this can’t be happening to me,” or the person can feel as though he or she is observing, rather than actually participating in, the event. Often, the passage of time will seem to grind to a halt. Crime victims frequently report experiencing this sensation and being unable to act during an unfolding crime.

Finding the Right Level

Now that we’ve discussed the different levels of awareness, let’s focus on identifying what level is ideal at a given time. The body and mind both require rest, so we have to spend several hours each day at the comatose level while asleep. When we are sitting at our homes watching a movie or reading a book, it is perfectly fine to operate in the tuned-out mode. However, some people will attempt to maintain the tuned-out mode in decidedly inappropriate environments (e.g., when they are out on the street at night in a third-world barrio), or they will maintain a mindset wherein they deny that they can be victimized by criminals. “That couldn’t happen to me, so there’s no need to watch for it.” They are tuned out.

Some people are so tuned out as they go through life that they miss even blatant signs of pending criminal activity directed specifically at them. In 1992, an American executive living in the Philippines was kidnapped by a Marxist kidnapping gang in Manila known as the “Red Scorpion Group.” When the man was debriefed following his rescue, he described in detail how the kidnappers had blocked off his car in traffic and abducted him. Then, to the surprise of the debriefing team, he said that on the day before he was abducted, the same group of guys had attempted to kidnap him at the exact same location, at the very same time of day and driving the same vehicle. The attackers had failed to adequately box his car in, however, and his driver was able to pull around the blocking vehicle and proceed to the office.

Since the executive did not consider himself to be a kidnapping target, he had just assumed that the incident the day before his abduction was “just another close call in crazy Manila traffic.” The executive and his driver had both been tuned out. Unfortunately, the executive paid for this lack of situational awareness by having to withstand an extremely traumatic kidnapping, which included almost being killed in the dramatic Philippine National Police operation that rescued him.

If you are tuned out while you are driving and something happens — say, a child runs out into the road or a car stops quickly in front of you — you will not see the problem coming. This usually means that you either do not see the hazard in time to avoid it and you hit it, or you totally panic and cannot react to it — neither is good. These reactions (or lack of reaction) occur because it is very difficult to change mental states quickly, especially when the adjustment requires moving several steps, say, from tuned out to high alert. It is like trying to shift your car directly from first gear into fifth and it shudders and stalls. Many times, when people are forced to make this mental jump and they panic (and stall), they go into shock and will actually freeze and be unable to take any action — they go comatose. This happens not only when driving but also when a criminal catches someone totally unaware and unprepared. While training does help people move up and down the alertness continuum, it is difficult for even highly trained individuals to transition from tuned out to high alert. This is why police officers, federal agents and military personnel receive so much training on situational awareness.

It is critical to stress here that situational awareness does not mean being paranoid or obsessively concerned about your security. It does not mean living with the irrational expectation that there is a dangerous criminal lurking behind every bush. In fact, people simply cannot operate in a state of focused awareness for extended periods, and high alert can be maintained only for very brief periods before exhaustion sets in. The “flight or fight” response can be very helpful if it can be controlled. When it gets out of control, however, a constant stream of adrenaline and stress is simply not healthy for the body or the mind. When people are constantly paranoid, they become mentally and physically burned out. Not only is this dangerous to physical and mental health, but security also suffers because it is very hard to be aware of your surroundings when you are a complete basket case. Therefore, operating constantly in a state of high alert is not the answer, nor is operating for prolonged periods in a state of focused alert, which can also be overly demanding and completely enervating. This is the process that results in alert fatigue. The human body was simply not designed to operate under constant stress. People (even highly skilled operators) require time to rest and recover.

Because of this, the basic level of situational awareness that should be practiced most of the time is relaxed awareness, a state of mind that can be maintained indefinitely without all the stress and fatigue associated with focused awareness or high alert. Relaxed awareness is not tiring, and it allows you to enjoy life while rewarding you with an effective level of personal security. When you are in an area where there is potential danger (which, by definition, is almost anywhere), you should go through most of your day in a state of relaxed awareness. Then if you spot something out of the ordinary that could be a potential threat, you can “dial yourself up” to a state of focused awareness and take a careful look at that potential threat (and also look for others in the area).

If the potential threat proves innocuous, or is simply a false alarm, you can dial yourself back down into relaxed awareness and continue on your merry way. If, on the other hand, you look and determine that the potential threat is a probable threat, seeing it in advance allows you to take actions to avoid it. You may never need to elevate to high alert, since you have avoided the problem at an early stage. However, once you are in a state of focused awareness you are far better prepared to handle the jump to high alert if the threat does change from potential to actual — if the three guys lurking on the corner do start coming toward you and look as if they are reaching for weapons. The chances of you going comatose are far less if you jump from focused awareness to high alert than if you are caught by surprise and “forced” to go into high alert from tuned out. An illustration of this would be the difference between a car making a sudden stop in front of a person when the driver is practicing defensive driving, compared to a car that makes a sudden stop in front of a person when the driver is sending a text message.

Of course, if you know that you must go into an area that is very dangerous, you should dial yourself up to focused awareness when you are in that area. For example, if there is a specific section of highway where a lot of improvised explosive devices detonate and ambushes occur, or if there is a part of a city that is controlled (and patrolled) by criminal gangs — and you cannot avoid these danger areas for whatever reason — it would be prudent to heighten your level of awareness when you are in those areas. An increased level of awareness is also prudent when engaging in common or everyday tasks, such as visiting an ATM or walking to the car in a dark parking lot. The seemingly trivial nature of these common tasks can make it all too easy to go on “autopilot” and thus expose yourself to threats. When the time of potential danger has passed, you can then go back to a state of relaxed awareness.

This process also demonstrates the importance of being familiar with your environment and the dangers that are present there. Such awareness allows you to avoid many threats and to be on the alert when you must venture into a dangerous area.

Clearly, few of us are living in the type of intense threat environment currently found in places like Mogadishu, Juarez or Kandahar. Nonetheless, average citizens all over the world face many different kinds of threats on a daily basis — from common thieves and assailants to criminals and mentally disturbed individuals aiming to conduct violent acts to militants wanting to carry out large-scale attacks against subways and aircraft.

Many of the steps required to conduct these attacks must be accomplished in a manner that makes the actions visible to the potential victim and outside observers. It is at these junctures that people practicing situational awareness can detect these attack steps, avoid the danger and alert the authorities. When people practice situational awareness they not only can keep themselves safer but they can also help keep others safe. And when groups of people practice situational awareness together they can help keep their schools, houses of worship, workplaces and cities safe from danger.

And as we’ve discussed many times before, as the terrorist threat continues to devolve into one almost as diffuse as the criminal threat, ordinary citizens are also becoming an increasingly important national security resource.


Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Zorro Filoso



Mensajes : 880
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : Mexicali, México

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 5:26 pm

¿Cual xingao es el tema de este 'iche thread?

Twisted Evil
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://zorrofiloso.blogspot.com
aereo



Mensajes : 847
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : Monterrey, Nuevo León

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 5:51 pm

Pues esperemos que así sea, ZaMaCoNa, que los Zetas estén realmente batallando para encontrar recursos financieros y humanos...
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
benjolin
Administrador
Administrador


Mensajes : 3609
Fecha de inscripción : 13/04/2010
Localización : Quesque en mi chamba...

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 6:23 pm



Chami:

¿Porque no pones el link de la pagina y el que quiera y pueda leer estos chorizos se los eche?

O mejor aun... danos tu opinion al respecto.

_________________
RETIRADO DEL FORO. NOS VEMOS EN OTROS ESPACIOS.

Smile Smile Smile Smile Smile Smile


El Benja´s Blog
**
Twitter
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://lapolacaforo.blogspot.com/
blogalifobico



Mensajes : 53
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Vie Ago 27, 2010 6:29 pm

Muy interesante.

Alguien por aca ha leido "The next 100 years" de G. Friedman?

(si, tiene bastante relacion con el post)
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Sáb Ago 28, 2010 12:15 pm

gordo no puedo poner el link porque es de paga la pinche pagina, los posteo como servicio a la comunidad, yo en lo personal los estoy utiliazando para evaluar si huimos en macoya alos united o no.
las notas de los zetas como que estan medio atrasadas (como las reaccioens del consulada de aca) pero en estos ultimos dias esta reventando todo el pedo, llevan no menos de 40 zetas arrestados, sepa dios cuantos muertos y ene decomisos de todo en 4 o 5 dias, aparte el pinch enorte esta saque y saque notas espantosas para fomentar la huida, ayer saco su nota de que las gentes de estudios y lana se quieren ir o se estan largando y hoy remato con la nota del consulado que recomendo sacar a todos los guercos gabachos de la ciudad.
de mi se acuerdan que mañana o el lunes saca otra nota por el estilo para seguir haciendo ruido, pareciera que busca que todos nos huyamos por estos lares.


el tema zorro son :REPORTES SOBRE MEXICO, ahi postie uno sobre awareness porque se me hizo interesante pero el resto son (y seguiran siendo si salen mas) reportes de seguridad, analisis y mas cosas sobre el pais hechos por gente al parecer muy profesional, son de straford, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stratfor) una pagina que me encontre que al parecer es buena en cuestion de seguridad mundial, inteligencia y mas.
espero que a alguien mas le sirvan, en lo personal si estan ayudando para tomar la decision de abandonar el barco o quedarnos tocando "Mas Cerca, Oh Dios de ti" con rodrigo medina

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
eljarras



Mensajes : 2823
Fecha de inscripción : 15/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Sáb Ago 28, 2010 12:30 pm

benjolin escribió:


Chami:

¿Porque no pones el link de la pagina y el que quiera y pueda leer estos chorizos se los eche?

O mejor aun... danos tu opinion al respecto.

Cuando yo me quejé de que el tema de José Cambar y el del Kukulcan parecían blog y no temas de foro, te salió el G Man que llevas adentro y mencionaste que cada quien participa como quiere y como puede, que el que no quiera ver o leer el contenido de esos temas, que no entre, que te valía si usaban el foro como blog, que estabas abierto (goloso) a todo tipo de participación.

Es cierto que esta liga parece blog y este no es un blog, es un foro, pero si dejaste claro que no tenías nada en contra de temas estilo blog, si defendiste 2 temas parecido, ¿no es incongruente quejarte de este?, yo no creo en estos temas, pero si se vale uno, se valen todos.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes : 3505
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Sáb Ago 28, 2010 12:57 pm

esto no hubiera pasado conmigo......
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
eljarras



Mensajes : 2823
Fecha de inscripción : 15/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Sáb Ago 28, 2010 1:05 pm

ZaMaCoNa escribió:
esto no hubiera pasado conmigo......

Che gordo se emborrachó de poder, necesitamos una revolución, si esto sigue así tendremos un bar virtual y mariloú abirá un café virtual.

No podrás engañar a los hijos de la revolución gordo.

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Ramses



Mensajes : 1308
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : Sinaloa

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Sáb Ago 28, 2010 1:23 pm

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEHHHHHHHH GORDOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
benjolin
Administrador
Administrador


Mensajes : 3609
Fecha de inscripción : 13/04/2010
Localización : Quesque en mi chamba...

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 2:45 pm

Le dije exactamente lo mismo a Cambar y Tito.

La respuesta fue: "Porque yo quiero".

Ahhh bueno.


_________________
RETIRADO DEL FORO. NOS VEMOS EN OTROS ESPACIOS.

Smile Smile Smile Smile Smile Smile


El Benja´s Blog
**
Twitter
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://lapolacaforo.blogspot.com/
Titivilus



Mensajes : 2265
Fecha de inscripción : 29/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 3:36 pm

Pues gracias, Chami, por copiarnos estos textos. Estan interesantes sin duda.

En el ultimo Foreign Affaires (en Ingles) salio un articulo sobre el combate contra el narco que esta muy interesante, y entre otras cosas dice que es una falacia pensar que si cortas una cabeza, hay una fuente inacabable denuevos capos. Dice que si hasta un par de niveles, y luego ya no. Ser capo de bandas de narcos no es algo que cualquiera pueda hacer. Asi que a punta de matarlos o meterlos al tambo, yo si pieneso que van a acabar ganando. Quienes van a ganar? Pues nosotros, los mexicanos. Y antes que alguien me salga con que yo vivo en el Gabacho, yo vivo aqui, pero mis guercos ya se estan regresando. El primero ya esta alla, con mi maraviloosa PathFinder y el que sigue se gradua en unos meses y va de retache. Asi que yo tengo vela personal en este entierro.

Asi que gracias, Zamacona, por tus links. Yo siempre pense que esta situacion desgraciada de nuestra patria es una fase, y la vamos a rebasar tarde o temprano. Par de anios tal vez?

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
eljarras



Mensajes : 2823
Fecha de inscripción : 15/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 3:41 pm

Voy a sonar al Chamy, pero una persona que sabe me asegura que el ejército iniciará una fuerte ofensiva la semana que viene en Tamaulipas, Nuevo León y partes de Coahuila, que se van a poner los tomate de a kilo.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
edgardini



Mensajes : 838
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : Tijuana

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 4:54 pm

Titivilus escribió:
En el ultimo Foreign Affaires (en Ingles) salio un articulo sobre el combate contra el narco que esta muy interesante, y entre otras cosas dice que es una falacia pensar que si cortas una cabeza, hay una fuente inacabable denuevos capos. Dice que si hasta un par de niveles, y luego ya no. Ser capo de bandas de narcos no es algo que cualquiera pueda hacer. Asi que a punta de matarlos o meterlos al tambo, yo si pieneso que van a acabar ganando. Quienes van a ganar? Pues nosotros, los mexicanos.
Yo tambien pienso que Mexico va a terminar ganando, pero en otros tiempos y circunstancias.

Estos analisis al parecer hablan del sistema de las drogas como un sistema donde solo hay abastecimiento mas no demanda. Mientras exista la demanda en EEUU por mercancia ilegal el sistema va a continuar con vida y si se acaban los capos mexicanos podrian salir de nuevo colombianos o de otro pais.

En Mexico, para que disminuya el problema de las drogas (y el de migracion) es imperativo que mejore la economia. Ademas, esa mejora de la economia debe de verse reflejado en la poblacion que tiene mas necesidades.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Titivilus



Mensajes : 2265
Fecha de inscripción : 29/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 5:30 pm

Edgardini, 100% de acuerdo.
Ese es el bottom line, aunque ya entramos a un circulo vicioso
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
aereo



Mensajes : 847
Fecha de inscripción : 20/04/2010
Localización : Monterrey, Nuevo León

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 9:09 pm

jarrambide escribió:
Voy a sonar al Chamy, pero una persona que sabe me asegura que el ejército iniciará una fuerte ofensiva la semana que viene en Tamaulipas, Nuevo León y partes de Coahuila, que se van a poner los tomate de a kilo.
Pues justamente acaban de atrapar a otro lider de los Zetas.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
cefaz
ex-Evenflo


Mensajes : 3106
Fecha de inscripción : 17/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Dom Ago 29, 2010 9:27 pm

Hace no mucho salio un reporte sobre como cuando se "ganaba" contra el narco lo unico que sucedia era que el poder se desplazaba, pero que el problema distaba de solucionarse.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Contenido patrocinado




MensajeTema: Re: REPORTES sobre mexico   Hoy a las 11:42 am

Volver arriba Ir abajo
 
REPORTES sobre mexico
Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba 
Página 1 de 2.Ir a la página : 1, 2  Siguiente
 Temas similares
-
» Sobre Ortega y Gasset....Ser de izquierda es como ser de derecha, una de las maneras que el hombre puede elegir para ser un imbecil
» Las garantias individuales
» Sobre los Aldeanos aqui en Miami, tengo mis "ideas" sobre esto , y ustedes?
» Sobre fotolibro
» mi mexico perdido

Permisos de este foro:No puedes responder a temas en este foro.
La Polaca  :: DEBATE :: Politica Nacional-
Cambiar a: