Politica Mexicana, Economia y Finanzas.
 
ÍndiceÍndice  SoporteSoporte  CalendarioCalendario  FAQFAQ  BuscarBuscar  MiembrosMiembros  Grupos de UsuariosGrupos de Usuarios  RegistrarseRegistrarse  Conectarse  AdministracionAdministracion  Viejo ForoViejo Foro  
Comparte | 
 

 Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo 
Ir a la página : Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Siguiente
AutorMensaje
ArGoNiQ



Mensajes: 1398
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: Queti

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Jue Mar 31, 2011 1:29 pm

LuisJ escribió:
Wally escribió:
LuisJ escribió:

estara muy lejos macuspana de laguna verde?


Laguna Verde está más cerca del DF que de Macuspana. Wink

no chingues, si de por si, ahora con eso, riesgo de chilangos mutantes???


Los chilangos ya eran mutantes desde antes, no culpes a la energía nuclear.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ArGoNiQ



Mensajes: 1398
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: Queti

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Jue Mar 31, 2011 1:33 pm

ZaMaCoNa escribió:
ingale como batalle para volver a encontrar esta nota, se me paso el 27 postearla y luego batalle a madres para localizarla

esta larga (como les gusta) pero en resumidas cuentas habla de que medio les valio madre la historia de el lugar para hacer la planta, 8 metros mas y no pasaba nada de nada.

bola de putos (ustedes y ellos)


http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_JAPAN_QUAKE_TSUNAMI_RISK?SITE=COBOU&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Citación :

AP News

Mar 27, 4:47 PM EDT

AP IMPACT: Nuclear plant downplayed tsunami risk

By YURI KAGEYAMA and JUSTIN PRITCHARD
Associated Press

TOKYO (AP) -- In planning their defense against a killer tsunami, the people running Japan's now-hobbled nuclear power plant dismissed important scientific evidence and all but disregarded 3,000 years of geological history, an Associated Press investigation shows.

The misplaced confidence displayed by Tokyo Electric Power Co. was prompted by a series of overly optimistic assumptions that concluded the Earth couldn't possibly release the level of fury it did two weeks ago, pushing the six-reactor Fukushima Dai-ichi complex to the brink of multiple meltdowns.

Instead of the reactors staying dry, as contemplated under the power company's worst-case scenario, the plant was overrun by a torrent of water much higher and stronger than the utility argued could occur, according to an AP analysis of records, documents and statements from researchers, the utility and the Japan's national nuclear safety agency.

And while TEPCO and government officials have said no one could have anticipated such a massive tsunami, there is ample evidence that such waves have struck the northeast coast of Japan before - and that it could happen again along the culprit fault line, which runs roughly north to south, offshore, about 220 miles (350 kilometers) east of the plant.

TEPCO officials say they had a good system for projecting tsunamis. They declined to provide more detailed explanations, saying they were focused on the ongoing nuclear crisis.

What is clear: TEPCO officials discounted important readings from a network of GPS units that showed that the two tectonic plates that create the fault were strongly "coupled," or stuck together, thus storing up extra stress along a line hundreds of miles long. The greater the distance and stickiness of such coupling, experts say, the higher the stress buildup - pressure that can be violently released in an earthquake.

That evidence, published in scientific journals starting a decade ago, represented the kind of telltale characteristics of a fault being able to produce the truly overwhelming quake - and therefore tsunami - that it did.

On top of that, TEPCO modeled the worst-case tsunami using its own computer program instead of an internationally accepted prediction method.

It matters how Japanese calculate risk. In short, they rely heavily on what has happened to figure out what might happen, even if the probability is extremely low. If the view of what has happened isn't accurate, the risk assessment can be faulty.

That approach led to TEPCO's disregard of much of Japan's tsunami history.

In postulating the maximum-sized earthquake and tsunami that the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex might face, TEPCO's engineers decided not to factor in quakes earlier than 1896. That meant the experts excluded a major quake that occurred more than 1,000 years ago - a tremor followed by a powerful tsunami that hit many of the same locations as the recent disaster.

A TEPCO reassessment presented only four months ago concluded that tsunami-driven water would push no higher than 18 feet (5.7 meters) once it hit the shore at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex. The reactors sit up a small bluff, between 14 and 23 feet (4.3 and 6.3 meters) above TEPCO's projected high-water mark, according to a presentation at a November seismic safety conference in Japan by TEPCO civil engineer Makoto Takao.

"We assessed and confirmed the safety of the nuclear plants," Takao asserted.

However, the wall of water that thundered ashore two weeks ago reached about 27 feet (8.2 meters) above TEPCO's prediction. The flooding disabled backup power generators, located in basements or on first floors, imperiling the nuclear reactors and their nearby spent fuel pools.

---

The story leading up to the Tsunami of 2011 goes back many, many years - several millennia, in fact.

The Jogan tsunami of 869 displayed striking similarities to the events in and around the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors. The importance of that disaster, experts told the AP, is that the most accurate planning for worst-case scenarios is to study the largest events over the longest period of time. In other words, use the most data possible.

The evidence shows that plant operators should have known of the dangers - or, if they did know, disregarded them.

As early as 2001, a group of scientists published a paper documenting the Jogan tsunami. They estimated waves of nearly 26 feet (8 meters) at Soma, about 25 miles north of the plant. North of there, they concluded that a surge from the sea swept sand more than 2 1/2 miles (4 kilometers) inland across the Sendai plain. The latest tsunami pushed water at least about 1 1/2 miles (2 kilometers) inland.

The scientists also found two additional layers of sand and concluded that two additional "gigantic tsunamis" had hit the region during the past 3,000 years, both presumably comparable to Jogan. Carbon dating couldn't pinpoint exactly when the other two hit, but the study's authors put the range of those layers of sand at between 140 B.C. and A.D. 150, and between 670 B.C. and 910 B.C.

In a 2007 paper published in the peer-reviewed journal Pure and Applied Geophysics, two TEPCO employees and three outside researchers explained their approach to assessing the tsunami threat to Japan's nuclear reactors, all 54 of which sit near the sea or ocean.

To ensure the safety of Japan's coastal power plants, they recommended that facilities be designed to withstand the highest tsunami "at the site among all historical and possible future tsunamis that can be estimated," based on local seismic characteristics.

But the authors went on to write that tsunami records before 1896 could be less reliable because of "misreading, misrecording and the low technology available for the measurement itself." The TEPCO employees and their colleagues concluded, "Records that appear unreliable should be excluded."

Two years later, in 2009, another set of researchers concluded that the Jogan tsunami had reached 1 mile (1.5 kilometers) inland at Namie, about 6 miles (10 kilometers) north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.

The warning from the 2001 report about the 3,000-year history would prove to be most telling: "The recurrence interval for a large-scale tsunami is 800 to 1,100 years. More than 1,100 years have passed since the Jogan tsunami, and, given the reoccurrence interval, the possibility of a large tsunami striking the Sendai plain is high."

---

The fault involved in the Fukushima Dai-ichi tsunami is part of what is known as a subduction zone. In subduction zones, one tectonic plate dives under another. When the fault ruptures, the sea floor snaps upward, pushing up the water above it and potentially creating a tsunami. Subduction zones are common around Japan and throughout the Pacific Ocean region.

TEPCO's latest calculations were started after a magnitude-8.8 subduction zone earthquake off the coast of Chile in February 2010.

In such zones over the past 50 years, earthquakes of magnitude 9.0 or greater have occurred in Alaska, Chile and Indonesia. All produced large tsunamis.

When two plates are locked across a large area of a subduction zone, the potential for a giant earthquake increases. And those are the exact characteristics of where the most recent quake occurred.

TEPCO "absolutely should have known better," said Dr. Costas Synolakis, a leading American expert on tsunami modeling and an engineering professor at the University of Southern California. "Common sense," he said, should have produced a larger predicted maximum water level at the plant.

TEPCO's tsunami modelers did not judge that, in a worst-case scenario, the strong subduction and coupling conditions present off the coast of Fukushima Dai-ichi could produce the 9.0-magnitude earthquake that occurred. Instead, it figured the maximum at 8.6 magnitude, meaning the March 11 quake was four times as powerful as the presumed maximum.

Shogo Fukuda, a TEPCO spokesman, said that 8.6 was the maximum magnitude entered into the TEPCO internal computer modeling for Fukushima Dai-ichi.

Another TEPCO spokesman, Motoyasu Tamaki, used a new buzzword, "sotegai," or "outside our imagination," to describe what actually occurred.

U.S. tsunami experts said that one reason the estimates for Fukushima Dai-ichi were so low was the way Japan calculates risk. Because of the island nation's long history of killer waves, Japanese experts often will look at what has happened - then project forward what is likely to happen again.

Under longstanding U.S. standards that are gaining popularity around the world, risk assessments typically scheme up a worst-case scenario based on what could happen, then design a facility like a nuclear power plant to withstand such a collection of conditions - factoring in just about everything short of an extremely unlikely cataclysm, like a large meteor hitting the ocean and creating a massive wave that kills hundreds of thousands.

In the early 1990s, Harry Yeh, now a tsunami expert and engineering professor at Oregon State University, was helping assess potential threats to the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant on the central California coast in the United States. During that exercise, he said, researchers considered a worst-case scenario involving a significantly larger earthquake than had ever been recorded there.

And then a tsunami was added. And in that Diablo Canyon model, the quake hit during a monster storm that was already pushing onto the shore higher waves than had ever been measured at the site.

In contrast, when TEPCO calculated its high-water mark at 18 feet (5.7 meters), the anticipated maximum earthquake was in the same range as others recorded off the coast of Fukushima Dai-ichi - and the only assumption about the water level was that the tsunami arrived at high tide.

Which, as is abundantly clear now, could not have been more wrong.

---

Pritchard reported from Los Angeles. AP writers Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo and Alicia Chang in Los Angeles and AP researcher Barbara Sambrinski in New York contributed to this report.

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

ven que no estoy tan orate?

Que dice?
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ArGoNiQ



Mensajes: 1398
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: Queti

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Jue Mar 31, 2011 1:34 pm

“Los científicos han calculado que, si un gran sismo irrumpe durante la madrugada en Tokai, Japón, habría entre 7,900 y 9,200 muertos, y estiman que los daños a los bienes inmuebles ascenderían a 310,000 millones de dólares. En el Centro de Preparativos Para el Terremoto de Tokai, un mapa ubica con exactitud 6449 lugares donde ocurren avalanchas; otro mapa muestra dónde podrían incendiarse 58402 casas tras un terremoto. Todo esta increíblemente calculado, lo único que falta es que tiemble ...”

(fuente: Joel Achenbach, El siguiente gran sismo, National Geographic en Español, abril 2006)
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes: 3505
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Jue Mar 31, 2011 2:30 pm

google translate

Citación :
En la planificación de su defensa contra un tsunami asesino, las personas que dirigen ahora cojeando Japón central nuclear desestimó las pruebas científicas importantes y todos, pero cuenta 3.000 años de historia geológica, muestra una investigación de Associated Press.

La confianza fuera de lugar que aparecen por Tokio Electric Power Co. fue motivada por una serie de hipótesis excesivamente optimista de que llegó a la conclusión de la Tierra no podría liberar el nivel de furia que hace dos semanas, empujando los seis reactores de Fukushima Dai-ichi compleja a la borde de colapsos múltiples.

En lugar de los reactores de permanecer seco, tal como se contempla en el escenario la compañía eléctrica es el peor de los casos, la planta fue invadida por un torrente de agua mucho mayor y más fuerte que la utilidad argumentó podría ocurrir, según un análisis de la AP de los registros, documentos y declaraciones de investigadores, la utilidad y nacional del Japón de la agencia de seguridad nuclear.

Y mientras TEPCO y funcionarios del gobierno han dicho que nadie podía haber previsto como un enorme tsunami, hay amplia evidencia de que tales olas han golpeado la costa noreste de Japón antes - y que podría volver a ocurrir a lo largo de la línea de falla culpable, que se extiende de norte al sur, mar adentro, a unas 220 millas (350 kilómetros) al este de la planta.

TEPCO funcionarios dicen que había un buen sistema para la proyección de los tsunamis. Se negó a dar explicaciones más detalladas, diciendo que se centraron en la crisis nuclear en curso.

Lo que está claro: los funcionarios TEPCO descuento lecturas importantes de una red de unidades de GPS que mostraron que las dos placas tectónicas que crean la falla se mostraron muy "unida", o pegadas, por lo tanto acumulando tensión adicional a lo largo de una línea de cientos de kilómetros de largo. Cuanto mayor sea la distancia y la viscosidad de acoplamiento, los expertos dicen que, cuanto mayor sea la acumulación de la tensión - la presión que puede ser lanzado con violencia en un terremoto.

Esa evidencia, publicados en revistas científicas a partir de hace una década, representó a la clase de características indicadoras de un defecto ser capaz de producir el sismo verdaderamente abrumadora - y por lo tanto del tsunami - que lo hizo.

Además de eso, TEPCO modelado del tsunami peor de los casos con su programa propio ordenador en lugar de un método de predicción internacionalmente aceptadas.

Lo que importa es la forma japonesa calcular el riesgo. En resumen, que dependen en gran medida lo que ha sucedido para averiguar lo que podría ocurrir, incluso si la probabilidad es muy baja. Si la vista de lo que ha sucedido no es exacta, la evaluación del riesgo puede estar defectuoso.

Este enfoque condujo a TEPCO la indiferencia de gran parte de la historia del tsunami de Japón.

Al postular el terremoto máximo de tamaño y el tsunami que el complejo de Fukushima Dai-ichi podría enfrentar, los ingenieros de TEPCO decidió no factor en terremotos anteriores a 1896. Eso significaba que los expertos excluyeron un gran terremoto que ocurrió hace más de 1.000 años - un temblor seguido de un tsunami de gran alcance que afectó a muchos de los mismos lugares que el reciente desastre.

Una reevaluación TEPCO presentado hace sólo cuatro meses llegó a la conclusión de que el agua impulsada por el tsunami empujaría no superior a 18 pies (5,7 metros) una vez que golpeó la costa en el complejo de Fukushima Dai-ichi. Los reactores se siente un pequeño acantilado, entre el 14 y 23 pies (4.3 metros y 6.3) por encima de proyecciones de TEPCO marea alta, según una presentación en una conferencia de seguridad sísmica de noviembre en Japón por el ingeniero civil TEPCO Makoto Takao.

"Hemos evaluado y confirmado la seguridad de las centrales nucleares", afirmó Takao.

Sin embargo, el muro de agua que en tierra tronó hace dos semanas alcanzó cerca de 27 pies (8,2 metros) por encima de la predicción de TEPCO. Las inundaciones discapacitados generadores de energía de reserva, ubicada en los sótanos o en los pisos primero, poniendo en peligro a los reactores nucleares y sus alrededores piscinas de combustible gastado.

---

La historia conduce al tsunami de 2011 se remonta a muchos, muchos años - de varios milenios, de hecho.

El tsunami Jogan de 869 que aparecen similitudes con los acontecimientos en y alrededor de los reactores de Fukushima Dai-ichi. La importancia de ese desastre, los expertos dijo a la AP, es que la planificación más precisa de escenarios del peor caso es el estudio de los eventos más grandes en el período más largo de tiempo. En otras palabras, utilizar la mayor cantidad de datos posible.

La evidencia muestra que los operadores de la planta debería haber sabido de los peligros - o, si lo sabía, caso omiso de ellos.

Ya en 2001, un grupo de científicos publicó un documento de documentar el tsunami Jogan. Se estima que las olas de casi 26 pies (8 metros) en Soma, a unos 25 kilómetros al norte de la planta. Al norte de allí, llegaron a la conclusión de que un aumento del mar barrió la arena de más de 2 1 / 2 millas (4 kilómetros) tierra adentro a través de la llanura de Sendai. El último tsunami empuja el agua por lo menos cerca de 1 1 / 2 millas (2 kilómetros) tierra adentro.

Los científicos también encontraron dos capas adicionales de arena y la conclusión de que otros dos "tsunamis gigantes" había golpeado a la región durante los últimos 3.000 años, ambos supuestamente comparable a Jogan. La datación con carbono no pudo determinar con exactitud cuando los otros dos afectados, pero los autores del estudio ponen el alcance de las capas de arena de entre 140 a. C. d. C. y el 150, y entre los años 670 a. C. y 910 a. C.

En un artículo de 2007 publicado en la revista científica pura y Geofísica Aplicada, dos empleados de TEPCO y tres investigadores externos se explica su enfoque de la evaluación de la amenaza de tsunami a los reactores nucleares de Japón, todos los 54 de que se sientan cerca del mar o el océano.

Para garantizar la seguridad de las centrales eléctricas costeras de Japón, recomendaron que las instalaciones se diseñarán para resistir las más altas del tsunami "en el lugar entre todos los futuros tsunamis históricos y posible que se puede estimar", basada en locales de características sísmicas.

Pero los autores se dedicó a escribir que los registros de tsunamis antes de 1896 podrían ser menos confiables debido a "errores de lectura, misrecording y la baja tecnología disponible para la medición en sí." Los empleados TEPCO y sus colegas concluyeron: "Los registros que aparecen poco fiables deben ser excluidos."

Dos años más tarde, en 2009, otro grupo de investigadores concluyó que el tsunami Jogan había llegado a una milla (1,5 kilómetros) tierra adentro, a Namie, cerca de 6 millas (10 kilómetros) al norte de la planta de Fukushima Dai-ichi.

La advertencia del informe de 2001 sobre la historia de 3.000 años resultaría ser más elocuente: ". El intervalo de recurrencia de un tsunami a gran escala es de 800 a 1.100 años más de 1.100 años han pasado desde que el tsunami Jogan, y, dada la intervalo de recurrencia, la posibilidad de un gran tsunami golpeando la planicie de Sendai es alta. "

---

El fallo que participan en el tsunami de Fukushima Dai-ichi es parte de lo que se conoce como una zona de subducción. En las zonas de subducción, una placa tectónica se sumerge en otro. Cuando se rompe el fallo, el fondo del mar se ajusta hacia arriba, empujando hacia arriba el agua por encima de ella y, potencialmente, la creación de un tsunami. Las zonas de subducción son comunes en todo Japón y en toda la región del Océano Pacífico.

últimos cálculos de TEPCO se iniciaron después de un terremoto de magnitud 8,8-zona de subducción frente a las costas de Chile en febrero de 2010.

En esas zonas en los últimos 50 años, los terremotos de magnitud 9.0 o mayor se han producido en Alaska, Chile e Indonesia. Todos producido grandes tsunamis.

Cuando dos placas se bloquean en una gran superficie de una zona de subducción, la posibilidad de un aumento gigantesco terremoto. Y esas son las características exactas del lugar donde el sismo más reciente ocurrió.

TEPCO "absolutamente debería haberlo sabido mejor," dijo el Dr. Costas Synolakis, un destacado experto estadounidense en el modelado del tsunami y un profesor de ingeniería en la Universidad del Sur de California. "El sentido común", dijo, debería haber producido un mayor nivel de agua máximo previsto en la planta.

modeladores de TEPCO tsunami no juzgó que, en el peor de los casos, la subducción fuerte y condiciones de acoplamiento presente en la costa de Fukushima Dai-ichi podría producir el terremoto de 9,0 grados de magnitud que se produjo. En su lugar, se calculó la magnitud máxima de 8,6, es decir, el 11 de marzo sismo fue cuatro veces más potente que la máximas estimadas.

Shogo Fukuda, un portavoz de TEPCO, dijo que el 8.6 fue la magnitud máxima entró en el modelado por ordenador TEPCO interior de Fukushima Dai-ichi.

Otro portavoz de TEPCO, Motoyasu Tamaki, utilizó una nueva palabra de moda, "sotegai," o "fuera de nuestra imaginación", para describir lo que realmente ocurrió.

expertos de EE.UU. por el tsunami, dijo que una de las razones las estimaciones de Fukushima Dai-ichi eran tan bajas fue la forma en que Japón calcula el riesgo. Debido a la larga historia de la nación de la isla de olas asesinas, los expertos japoneses a menudo se verá en lo que ha sucedido - a continuación del proyecto hacia adelante lo que es probable que suceda de nuevo.

Bajo las normas de EE.UU. desde hace mucho tiempo que están ganando popularidad en todo el mundo, las evaluaciones de riesgo suelen plan, hasta el peor de los casos basados ​​en lo que podría pasar, a continuación, diseñar una instalación como una planta de energía nuclear para soportar un conjunto de condiciones - de factoring en casi todo por debajo de un cataclismo muy improbable, como un gran meteoro que golpea el océano y la creación de una ola masiva que mata a cientos de miles.

En la década de 1990, Harry Yeh, ahora un experto en tsunamis y profesor de ingeniería en la Universidad Estatal de Oregon, estaba ayudando a evaluar las amenazas potenciales a la planta de energía nuclear de Diablo Canyon en la costa central de California en los Estados Unidos. Durante ese ejercicio, dijo, los investigadores consideran el peor de los caso en que un terremoto mucho mayor de lo que se haya registrado allí.

Y luego se añadió un tsunami. Y en ese modelo de Diablo Canyon, el sismo ocurrió durante una tormenta monstruo que ya estaba empujando en la costa olas más altas que jamás se había medido en el sitio.

En cambio, cuando TEPCO calculó su apogeo a los 18 pies (5,7 metros), el terremoto máxima prevista era en el mismo rango que otros registraron en la costa de Fukushima Dai-ichi - y la única suposición sobre el nivel del agua es que el tsunami llegó con la marea alta.

Que, como es muy claro ahora, no podía estar más equivocado.

queda medio raro pero se entiende
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes: 3505
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Jue Mar 31, 2011 3:48 pm

al parecer este es el que les dijo que estaban diseñando mal la planta en fuck-U-shima



creoq ue tepco va a tener un añito como el de BP, no van a salir muy bien de este pedo porque la gente por alla esta comenzando a verlos muy feo (asi como que con los ojos entrecerrados...)
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
LuisJ



Mensajes: 977
Fecha de inscripción: 24/03/2011
Edad: 46
Localización: Guanatos (ahora si)

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Vie Abr 01, 2011 12:35 pm

esto esta cabron

"Lo tienen claro. Saben cuál va a ser su futuro o por lo menos se lo imaginan. Los 300 trabajadores, entre bomberos y personal, que desde el pasado 11 de marzo trabajan en turnos rotatorios de 50 para atajar la crisis de la central de Fukushima sólo "esperan morir" ante los altos niveles de radiación a los que han estado y están expuestos.
La madre de uno de estos 'liquidadores' confesó al diario británicoThe Daily Telegraph que su hijo y el resto de trabajadores se reunieron y discutieron sobre su situación llegando a la conclusión que su única posibilidad es la muerte.
"Mi hijo y sus colegas analizaron detenidamente su situación y se resignaron a morir si es necesario a largo plazo", afirmó la mujer.
Además, una serie de mails, revelados por la prensa y que fueron enviados por los 'liquidadores' a familiares y miembros de Tepco revelan las extremas condiciones en las que se encuentran.
"Llorar es inútil. Si estamos en el infierno ahora todo lo que se puede hacer es trepar hasta el cielo. Por favor, tengan cuidado con la fuerza oculta de la energía nuclear. Me aseguraré de que vayamos a recuperarnos", registra uno de los correos."

http://www.excelsior.com.mx/index.php?m=nota&id_nota=726541

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
LuisJ



Mensajes: 977
Fecha de inscripción: 24/03/2011
Edad: 46
Localización: Guanatos (ahora si)

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Lun Abr 04, 2011 8:26 am

dicen que la vida imita al arte, pues con esto "Lanzarán 11,500 toneladas de agua radiactiva al mar en Japón" http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/756525.html

no falta mucho para que podamos tener a blinky con nosotros



alguien quiere un sushi?
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Netzahualcóyotl



Mensajes: 828
Fecha de inscripción: 22/04/2010
Localización: LPZ, B. C. Sur, México

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Mar Abr 05, 2011 2:40 pm

De nuevo la pulga:



Se lleva las palmas. lol!
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Chalchipinke
Moderador
Moderador


Mensajes: 2190
Fecha de inscripción: 14/04/2010
Localización: Tejuino & Moist Food's Land

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Mar Abr 05, 2011 2:45 pm

JUAR!


muy bueno!

_________________
"Cuando advierta que para producir necesita obtener autorización de quienes no producen nada; cuando compruebe que el dinero fluye hacia quienes trafican no bienes, sino favores; cuando perciba que muchos se hacen ricos por el soborno y por influencias más que por el trabajo, y que las leyes no lo protegen contra ellos sino, por el contrario, son ellos los que están protegidos contra usted; cuando repare que la corrupción es recompensada y la honradez se convierte en un autosacrificio, entonces podrá afirmar, sin temor a equivocarse, que su sociedad está condenada"
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Titivilus



Mensajes: 2265
Fecha de inscripción: 29/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Mar Abr 05, 2011 2:52 pm

Esta estupendo. Me cae que si empiezo a circularlo entre cierto elemento de mi familia, van a empezar a llegarme los correos:

"TTVLS (bueno, mi verdadero apodo) Es cierto esto? Es por el Cambio Global? Es culpa de AMLO (en mi familia son medio panistas)?

Muy, muy bueno
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ArGoNiQ



Mensajes: 1398
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: Queti

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Mar Abr 12, 2011 10:36 am

Hace varios días me llegó un correo muy interesante (estuve baneado del foro temporalmente y no pude comentar nada hasta ahora):


Citación :




Luego de la explosión nuclear a las 16:30 del domingo en Fukushima Japón, todos debemos tener precaución.
Si llueve hoy o los próximos días, NO IR BAJO LA LLUVIA. Se debe utilizar paragua o impermeable, incluso si es solo una llovizna. Esto por que especialistas de centrales nucleares han señalado que las partículas radiactivas pueden llegar a la atmosfera, estar en la capa de ozono extendiéndose en todo el mundo por la lluvia, lo que puede causar quemaduras, alopecia o incluso cáncer. Por favor transmitir esta información.

No lo elimine..compartalo!


Hubo dos aspectos que me llamaron la atención. Uno de ellos es que me lo envió una persona profesionista en ciencias químicas (bueno una QFB. De ellos no se puede esperar otra cosa mas que agarren caca con las manos). Aun así llama la atención que gente con conocimientos aunque sea básicos se crea estas mamadas.
La otra es que esa imagen y la nota fue en realidad publicada por el periódico excelsior. Bueno, tampoco es que se pueda esperar mucho de un periodicucho, pero en si la mayoría de los medios por generar noticias relacionadas, caen en errores evidentes o inventan información. Nada nuevo, vaya.


Curioso como soy, me metí a la pagina de la empresa de servicios cuyo logo aparece en el mapa: Australian Radiation Service Ltd

Lo primero que encuentro es esto en letrotas rojas:

Citación :
DISCLAIMER: Australian Radiation Services is aware of information about radioactive contamination being spread from the Japanese nuclear reactor incident released under the ARS logo and name. We wish to be clear that this information has not originated from ARS and as such distance ourselves from any such misinformation.

Investigando el origen del mapa encuentro que el mismo se encuentra en la pagina del UNSCEAR, pero con unos valores bastante diferentes, encontrando que en el pico máximo, la medida de la radiación es miles de veces menor y que también el tiempo ha sido modificado para crear un efecto de rápida propagación. El logo ha sido modificado, colocando en su lugar el de ARS.



En fin, toda una dulzura de correo. Luego tenemos funcionarios del gobierno advirtiendo que no salgan sin paraguas de sus casas para que no les vaya a caer la radiación encima.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
kytaro



Mensajes: 1438
Fecha de inscripción: 21/04/2010

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Mar Abr 12, 2011 10:59 am

El Papi escribió:


Hubo dos aspectos que me llamaron la atención. Uno de ellos es que me lo envió una persona profesionista en ciencias químicas (bueno una QFB. De ellos no se puede esperar otra cosa mas que agarren caca con las manos).


Épale culero... no sólo batimos merde con las manos... jajaja... che culero we!!! Juar, juar...
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ArGoNiQ



Mensajes: 1398
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: Queti

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Mar Abr 12, 2011 12:37 pm

A poco ya usan cucharas?
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Netzahualcóyotl



Mensajes: 828
Fecha de inscripción: 22/04/2010
Localización: LPZ, B. C. Sur, México

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Vie Abr 15, 2011 7:21 pm

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
ZaMaCoNa



Mensajes: 3505
Fecha de inscripción: 20/04/2010
Localización: aqui y que?

MensajeTema: Re: Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?   Sáb Abr 16, 2011 12:06 pm

ayer leia que hasta los terremotos se los querian endilgar al cambio climatico......

lo unico bueno es que entrevistaron a un cientifico y d eplano ya dijo que se maman, que ya no le cuelguen todo al cambio climatico.

yo creo que al revez, un aparte fuerte del cambio climatico viene por un cambio en la tierra (ya sea por el sol o lo que sea) y por eso los terremotos y tanto pedo, creo que viene un cambio de algo, igual y los alucioandos del cambio del polo magnetico no andan tan mal despues de todo.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
 

Terremoto, Tsunami, Incendios en Japon.. que sigue? Godzilla?

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba 
Página 9 de 10.Ir a la página : Precedente  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Siguiente

 Temas similares

-
» Recuerdan a NINGIO?? Hágamos oración por ella. Terremoto y Tsunami en Japón
» TERREMOTO EN JAPON
» TERREMOTO EN JAPON
» Memoria del terremoto que sacudió Santiago de Cuba en 1932 ( ahora es que me entero de esto)
» Supuesto OVNI en el tsunami de Japón

Permisos de este foro:No puedes responder a temas en este foro.
La Polaca  ::  :: -